Diesel F150 Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


Every year the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) evaluates new vehicles and hands out safety awards accordingly. This year, both the 2018 Ford F-150 crew cab and extended cab received the 2017 Top Safety Pick accolade.

To qualify, a vehicle must earn a ‘good’ rating in at least five crashworthiness tests and score an advanced or superior rating for front crash prevention. The battery of controlled crashes performed includes driver-side small overlap front, moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraints.

The F-150 managed to receive a good rating across the board and its crash prevention systems scored a ‘superior’ grade thanks to the emergency collision warning system and optional automatic emergency braking system. When tested by IIHS, the braking system was able to come to a complete stop at both 10 mph and 25 mph.

Unfortunately, a ‘poor’ mark prevented the F-150 from receiving Top Safety Pick + award. As the highest designation handed out by IIHS, vehicles need to meet the previously mentioned criteria and an acceptable or good headlight rating.No matter the trim and variant, every F-150 earned a ‘poor’ rating. This could be caused by inadequate visibility on either side of the vehicle in both straightaway and curves tests.

Aside from its headlights, the F-150 is still one of the most highly rated production pickups sold. No doubt, Ford's upcoming diesel powered F-150 will fare just as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Sounds like the headlights failed when it comes to curve illumination, which could be fixed with curve-adaptive lights but I don't think Ford offers this in any of their vehicles, at least not from my recollection. Not sure if a brighter set of bulbs will help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
A headlight setup that has a few projector would help, much like what we have been seeing in LED headlight systems, but that alone would cause a big rise in price, and of course that is something more well suited for Lincoln right now. If Ford didn't have Lincoln then maybe LED's would have happened here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Those headlights do illuminate pedestrians, cyclists and animals much earlier in the dark but they aren't really a necessity so long as you're an attentive driver. Overall the score is perfect in my eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Those headlights do illuminate pedestrians, cyclists and animals much earlier in the dark but they aren't really a necessity so long as you're an attentive driver. Overall the score is perfect in my eyes.
You have a point. I can see it being really useful on dark roads that deers are known to be crossing on but even then you can prevent of diminish the capacity an impact can have on you and your vehicle by going slow enough. Then of course there's the old and handy deer whistles you get for a few bucks at the auto store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Never heard of deer whistles, though I'd imagine they'd be useful alongside the F150's high-beam at night on country roads. With how sturdy the F-150 in its frontal crash test, it'll take a moose to do much damage. But I don't wish to test that in real life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Never heard of deer whistles, though I'd imagine they'd be useful alongside the F150's high-beam at night on country roads. With how sturdy the F-150 in its frontal crash test, it'll take a moose to do much damage. But I don't wish to test that in real life.
Its a common thing that people use, common enough that you can find it at some gas stations, and most automotive stores... it's that common. No matter what we have the advantage. Biggest issue with hitting a deer or moose is when it goes through your windshield, it will be hard for that to happen here!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top