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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,
Obviously new to the forum. Looking @ a 2018 f-150 3.0 turbo power stroke. It’s got 43k miles, one owner, southern state. Lariat trim level w/ the luxury package (502 I think)

I’ve owned a 2012 3.0 twin turbo gas f-150 and loved it, but don’t know anything about the diesel.

what do I need to be aware of & what do I need to consider? I’ve scanned the forum, but honestly, a diesel wasn’t on my radar?
 

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Welcome! As you already know the Lariat is a very comfortable form of transportation. You will love it I think.

As for problems, in my opinion the engine is flawless and has proven itself for years overseas. Most of our problems discussed here are related to the egr valve which has been recalled twice, hopefully they have it right now. Other issues are common ones with the F150 series. Please feel free to look through the various posts and I think you will find these are reliable and thrifty trucks.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask!
 

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@Senoiasummer - welcome aboard to the forums!

Lot of info to digest here in the forums, but here is a good starting point for you:

Would you buy again?

I cover a bunch of pros vs cons in Post #6 of the above thread that address a lot diesel ownership things to think about, that I won't bother repeating here again....

Things I would be looking out for:
  1. Ask the seller is EGR By-Pass recalls Valve (18E02/20E04) have been performed
  2. Better yet, ask the dealer for a VIN-specific OASIS report which will answer #1
  3. What type of driving do you plan on doing? Mostly City? Mostly Highway?
  4. Do you plan to use this vehicle for towing?
  5. FORScan for monitoring & programming
The F150 3.0L PSD + 10-speed transmission is really optimized for highway driving, where the truck can burn the diesel fuel very efficiently (passive regeneration) without generating much soot. City driving (short trips where engine doesn't get to operating temps) cause a lot of soot (unburned fuel) to be created and fill the DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) quickly requiring Active Regenerations (think dumping extra fuel in exhaust to burn off soot collected in DPF) City driving/short trips also leads to short (< 5K miles) oil change intervals. These trucks really like to be driven, and are great daily drivers if you want to tow and not own a SuperDuty.

Ford nor the seller is going to talk about regen cycles (the hidden/dirty side of 1/2 ton diesel ownership) so start with the thread above and make sure you read the eye-opening Stuck in regen??? thread to see how we figured this all out.

I suggest reading up on the links I pointed you at above, and then come back with any further questions you might have.
 
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Do it. My 2018 has been awesome. I have 38k on mine now. After having owned it for a couple years, it hasn't been that much more difficult to maintain over a gasser, just make sure you do the following:

  • Use good quality fuel from a reputable brand (higher volume station if possible)
  • Use a cetane an lubricity additive to keep those fuel pumps and injectors healthy (not critical but will probably have benefits down the road)
  • Ensure the EGR recalls are done as mentioned above
  • Change your fuel filters ever 15K miles or so
  • Use a good oil, if you tow, 5W40 CK-4 is a must.
  • Watch your regen cycles, and let them complete if you can.

Doing this my truck has not given me a single issue, and I watch it closely. might not be the best choice if you mainly do short trips, but if you tour around lots on the highway, these things are great. It's been my favourite truck/engine combo yet. I've owned a 95 F150 5.0, a 2005 F250 6.0, a 2012 F150 5.0, and a 2017 F-350 6.2. This truck gets more than double the fuel economy of my old 6.2, really happy with that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. All very helpful. While I like the idea of the PSD (picking up the lingo already!) I am not sure it is for me at this point. This truck would be my everyday driver. I have a couple of years until retirement & drive about 15 mi/25 min each way to work each day w/ only 3 miles on the interstate. I think I would might obsess over watching the regen cycle. After retirement it might be a better choice, as we own a small travel trailer and would probably be pulling it more often.
So, the PSD may not be for me at this time, but I learned a lot reading the posts & really appreciate the passion of the drivers of these trucks.

thanks all,

jeff
Senoia, Ga
 

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Hey,
Obviously new to the forum. Looking @ a 2018 f-150 3.0 turbo power stroke. It’s got 43k miles, one owner, southern state. Lariat trim level w/ the luxury package (502 I think)

I’ve owned a 2012 3.0 twin turbo gas f-150 and loved it, but don’t know anything about the diesel.

what do I need to be aware of & what do I need to consider? I’ve scanned the forum, but honestly, a diesel wasn’t on my radar?
 

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I'm new, can I piggy back on this thread?
In the same boat. Looking at a 2018 3.0L PSD...lariat with 55K miles.

And I know nothing.....reading these threads, has me a bit nervous about converting to diesel.

Is there a how to? What to look for guide before I drop 45k and screw up the engine because I didn't realize it was stuck in regen or my DEF ran out...

HELP!?!?
 

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@TINA2001TC - sure you can piggyback off this thread...

Couple things regarding your comments:
  1. Very hard to run out of DEF without knowing
    a.) DEF % Full indicator is available in IPC (Instrument Panel Cluster)
    b.) Amber alerts You need to OK out of in IPC when you start getting close to empty
  2. DPF % Full is not exposed by Ford (probably because of owners like me over-analyzing things)
    a.) DPF % Full can be exposed via FORScan programming (we have How-To instructions)
    b.) Many owners don't expose DPF % Full or worry about it effects,
    but then ask why they aren't getting the marketed 10K oil change intervals
  3. The "Stuck in regen" thread is a misleading title for the thread, but we learned a lot:
    a.) Regens forced at 300 mile limit
    b.) Active Regens only initiate at 100% Full and EGTs above 578F
    c.) Active Regens won't stop if you stop at a red light
    d.) Active Regens will stop if you put the truck in Park
    e.) Distance between Regens & BioDiesel are biggest contributors to oil life
  4. Most important question I ask to perspective buyers is: What is your driving style?
    a.) Around town/City driving? (Lots of stop-and-go short trips)
    b.) Highway driving?
    c.) Light towing?
If you answer a.) to #4, then I would say you want to read some of threads above, just so you know what you might be getting into. If you answer b.) or c.) to #4, then an F150 PSD is a good candidate for you, as these trucks are really designed for being driven, especially on the highway.

I am by no means trying to scare perspective owners away from this platform, but I do feel responsible for warning perspective owners (especially those new to diesel ownership) of some things we have learned so that they can make an educated buying decision.

Feel free to post back with your driving style and any questions you might have.
 

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@TINA2001TC - sure you can piggyback off this thread...

Couple things regarding your comments:
  1. Very hard to run out of DEF without knowing
    a.) DEF % Full indicator is available in IPC (Instrument Panel Cluster)
    b.) Amber alerts You need to OK out of in IPC when you start getting close to empty
  2. DPF % Full is not exposed by Ford (probably because of owners like me over-analyzing things)
    a.) DPF % Full can be exposed via FORScan programming (we have How-To instructions)
    b.) Many owners don't expose DPF % Full or worry about it effects,
    but then ask why they aren't getting the marketed 10K oil change intervals
  3. The "Stuck in regen" thread is a misleading title for the thread, but we learned a lot:
    a.) Regens forced at 300 mile limit
    b.) Active Regens only initiate at 100% Full and EGTs above 578F
    c.) Active Regens won't stop if you stop at a red light
    d.) Active Regens will stop if you put the truck in Park
    e.) Distance between Regens & BioDiesel are biggest contributors to oil life
  4. Most important question I ask to perspective buyers is: What is your driving style?
    a.) Around town/City driving? (Lots of stop-and-go short trips)
    b.) Highway driving?
    c.) Light towing?
If you answer a.) to #4, then I would say you want to read some of threads above, just so you know what you might be getting into. If you answer b.) or c.) to #4, then an F150 PSD is a good candidate for you, as these trucks are really designed for being driven, especially on the highway.

I am by no means trying to scare perspective owners away from this platform, but I do feel responsible for warning perspective owners (especially those new to diesel ownership) of some things we have learned so that they can make an educated buying decision.

Feel free to post back with your driving style and any questions you might have.
@jmperlik
Thank you so very much for the information.
My drive style is a mix.
I live about 13 miles to the closest stoplight. So anyplace I go, is roughly a 30-45 minute minimum. When I do my errands, like grocery hauls or trips into town. And those trips are 1-2x per week. I'm not sure if that is considered City driving.
Then next usage would be trips on county/state hwy averages 3-4 hours.
 

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@jmperlik
Thank you so very much for the information.
My drive style is a mix.
I live about 13 miles to the closest stoplight. So anyplace I go, is roughly a 30-45 minute minimum. When I do my errands, like grocery hauls or trips into town. And those trips are 1-2x per week. I'm not sure if that is considered City driving. Then next usage would be trips on county/state hwy averages 3-4 hours.
@TINA2001TC - my truck reaches optimal operating temps in ~10-15 minutes (depending on season) where active or passive regens can occur. Your trips are long enough for the truck to get up to operating temps and still have time to complete an Active Regen.

When I have asked other owners who asked why such short oil change intervals about their driving profile, I have gotten back "2-5 mile daily commute" responses = this is what I would consider city driving. Trip duration is what you are looking for and not necessarily at highway speeds.

Based on your statement that your minimum trip is 30 minutes and your overall mix of city & highway driving, I'd say you are a perfect candidate for F150 PSD ownership and will be very happy with the platform and its fuel efficiency. I'd say go-for-it based on your driving profile.

Still go read Post #6 in the Would you buy again? thread for diesel ownership pros vs cons for the "What to look for" guide you are looking for...
 
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@TINA2001TC - my truck reaches optimal operating temps in ~10-15 minutes (depending on season) where active or passive regens can occur. Your trips are long enough for the truck to get up to operating temps and still have time to complete an Active Regen.

When I have asked other owners who asked why such short oil change intervals about their driving profile, I have gotten back "2-5 mile daily commute" responses = this is what I would consider city driving. Trip duration is what you are looking for and not necessarily at highway speeds.

Based on your statement that your minimum trip is 30 minutes and your overall mix of city & highway driving, I'd say you are a perfect candidate for F150 PSD ownership and will be very happy with the platform and its fuel efficiency. I'd say go for it based on your driving profile.

Still go read Post #6 in the Would you buy again? thread for diesel ownership pros vs cons for the "What to look for" guide you are looking for...
@jmperlik

Again, thank you for the outline above. Watched a couple videos and I feel more confident now. I have a couple follow-up questions for the dealership; before I can move forward. Is there anything I should 100% ask about before driving off the lot? I think when I test drove it today, I wasn't equipped to ask the right questions. Do you see any potential problems with a 2018 with 55k miles?

My follow-up questions for the dealership:
When was the EGR repair completed?
What is the current DEF level, last filter replaced?

A quick question for the forum, How do I know what the optimal operating temps are? And secondly, any words of wisdom for cold weather, since I live in Wisconsin.

I will 100% be putting the DPF % with FORScan, that will be a adventure!
 

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I'll take a stab at answering your questions:

Do you see any potential problems with a 2018 with 55k miles?
Answer: No

When was the EGR repair completed?
Better question: Can I get the VIN-specific OASIS report for this vehicle?
Reason: VIN-specific OASIS report will provide you the entire Ford Service history for the vehicle (including all recalls)

What is the current DEF level, last filter replaced?
Better questions: Current DEF level + when were all (Air/Fuel/Oil/Cabin) filters changed?
Best question: Will you be performing Ford's 60K scheduled service before my taking ownership?
Reason: 60K service includes: Engine oil/filter change, Fuel Filter change, Cabin & Engine Air Filter change

How do I know what the optimal operating temps are?
1.) You can display engine & transmission temps over the gauges in your IPC (= gives you rough idea)
2.) You can use an iPhone w/FORScan Lite & wireless OBDii adapter to monitor EGT temps
3.) You can purchase an OBDii monitor like Edge Insight CTS3 to monitor EGT temps

Any words of wisdom for cold weather, since I live in Wisconsin.
1.) Diesel Fuel Additive w/Cold Weather Protection (I run Stanadyne Performance Formula)
2.) Maybe install an Engine Block heater if temps consistently below 0F
 

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I'll take a stab at answering your questions:


Answer: No


Better question: Can I get the VIN-specific OASIS report for this vehicle?
Reason: VIN-specific OASIS report will provide you the entire Ford Service history for the vehicle (including all recalls)


Better questions: Current DEF level + when were all (Air/Fuel/Oil/Cabin) filters changed?
Best question: Will you be performing Ford's 60K scheduled service before my taking ownership?
Reason: 60K service should include: Engine oil + filter change, Fuel Filter change, Air Filter change


1.) You can display engine & transmission temps over the gauges in your IPC (= gives you rough idea)
2.) You can use an iPhone w/FORScan Lite & wireless ODBii adapter to monitor EGT temps
3.) You can purchase an ODBii monitor like Edge Insight CTS3 to monitor EGT temps


1.) Diesel Fuel Additive w/Cold Weather Protection (I run Stanadyne Performance Formula)
2.) Maybe install an Engine Block heater if temps consistently below 0F
WOW, Thanks! I'm going to really appreciate this forum.
 

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TINA2001TC, in response to your question: "any words of wisdom for cold weather, since I live in Wisconsin." I'm sure you've learned to make sure your windshield washer fluid is winterized to potential coldest temperatures prior to when those temps occur. Same thing with diesel fuel. Diesel fuel - especially the fuel in the vehicle - must be winterized prior to cold temperatures which could cause the fuel to gel. There are several highly regarded diesel fuel additives with cold weather anti-gel properties. Depending on how often the fuel in the tank is replenished, you may desire to winterize the fuel that goes in your tank prior to when the fuel supplier winderizes the fuel you purchase. Also, when purchasing diesel fuel, it's worth asking when the fuel gets winterized and to what temperature.
 

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WOW, Thanks! I'm going to really appreciate this forum.
Also don't overthink it too much, we here at the forum tend to dive deep and pick away at how everything works because we're nerds, but the truck itself is pretty fool proof, and as long as you use a good quality fuel, change your oil and fuel filters (properly), complete your recalls, and drive it, there really isn't too much that you'll need to worry about. If you live in a cold climate, the fuel suppliers automatically adjust the fuel to account for the seasons, so you really don't even need to worry too much there, but a good all around fuel additive will help keep things clean, lubricated and flowing and burning for peace of mind. These engines seem to be the most reliable of the 1/2 ton diesels, with really the only major issues stemming from the EGR valve that has seen two recalls, however as long as these are done you should be good to go. There have been no other changes made to the engine since 2018.
 
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