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A lot of discussion recently over oil changes, and I understand the value of having professionals take care of this messy job, but if you can do it at home it can be quick, clean and easy. This last change took maybe 30 minutes (could be faster if I ever get organized beforehand).

Not a single drop was spilled. I used Rotella T6 5W40 synthetic (6 1/2 quarts), a Motorcraft filter, and a 32 mm socket. Also had a funnel and a catch pan.

When I first did a change I dropped the lower "diaper" but after that I drilled a 2 or 3 inch hole in the plastic diaper and also added a Fumoto valve. The Fumoto valve is discussed in this thread here.

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The Fumoto valve is the brass device. The hole ain't purty but it works. A pro would do a better job.

Next I reached up and opened the valve.

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Up on top I unscrewed the filter cap, removed the old filter which was in great shape.

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This is a photo of the old oil filter.

A pick tool makes changing the O ring easy. A new o ring should be in the filter box from Motorcraft. Next lube the o ring. Pay particular attention to the proper installation procedure. Lube the filter ends and place it in the filter hole, then put the cap over it and torque it down to 18 ft pounds.

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Close the Fumoto valve and fill with new oil. Start engine, build up pressure and then turn it off. A few minutes later check the level. It will be a little hard to see the fresh oil on the dipstick.

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And done. Get cleaned up and treat yourself to a meal downtown on the money you just saved.

Be sure and recycle used oil at your local car parts store.
 

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Nice simple write up.

Rotella T6 has been impossible to find around here. I've been using for so many years in my Deere tractor and VW TDI. I feel lost.....

And thanks for the link to the Fumuto valve thread! I also found in there the oil chart for the spec oil for the 3.0l Ford diesel - good info!
 

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Yes, this about cleared out my T6 5w40 inventory. Last Oct I did the motorhome and had to hit 3 Walmarts to get enough and some extra. There is still no T6 anywhere although last week some T6 15W40 did pop up for a day or so.

Interesting story, the motorhome uses 5 gallons and I wanted to put a Fumoto valve on it before I changed the oil. I had my wife hold the wet/dry vacuum on the oil fill tube while I unscrewed the drain plug, screwed on the Fumoto and good to go, not a drop of oil came out. I had heard you could do this but i wasn't too sure.
 

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before I changed the oil. I had my wife hold the wet/dry vacuum on the oil fill tube while I unscrewed the drain plug, screwed on the Fumoto and good to go, not a drop of oil came out. I had heard you could do this but i wasn't too sure.
I frequent a John Deere forum - I own a compact diesel. That trick with the vacuum is suggested and used there quite often. Sometimes someone wants to change the hydraulic filter without changing the gallons of hydro oil. The filter is near the bottom of the sump. The vacuum trick works well for that also.

I need to remember stuff like this. Getting older now and I never think of these things until I am done.

And the Fumoto valve - weather I keep my current trpuck or end up with that diesel I am waiting on I am going to install one. The worst part for me with these trucks is dealing with that skirt underneath.
 

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The most annoying part of this job for me is dealing with the diaper. It seems that many people just take it off and leave it off. Next oil change I will either cut a hole like in the pictures above or just leave it in my garage.

The fumoto valve is definitely a good investment, and I think I have enough oil for maybe 3 more oil changes. Hopefully the Rotella T6 will be more available by then…
 

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The most annoying part of this job for me is dealing with the diaper. It seems that many people just take it off and leave it off. Next oil change I will either cut a hole like in the pictures above or just leave it in my garage.

The fumoto valve is definitely a good investment, and I think I have enough oil for maybe 3 more oil changes. Hopefully the Rotella T6 will be more available by then…
My set-up is exactly like Dunrollin has with the Fumoto and a hole in the underbody panel. My philosophy on an underbody panel is that Ford won't spend money on an item unless it serves some purpose.

With the lower engine panel, I imagine it is there to:
1.) Reduce noise
2.) Keep corrosive salt, calcium chlorides, etc out of the engine bay
3.) Help warm/keep the engine warm when the grille shutters are closed
4.) Direct cooling air where it needs to go when the engine is hot
5.) Improve fuel efficiency

I may be inventing benefits that don't exist, but my underbody panels stay in place.

As for the oil, I picked up 20 liters of Lubri-Moly Special Tec AA 5W-40, as it is one of the approved oils on Ford's WSS-M2C171-F1 list. I am concerned about what I will be doing this winter, as there are only five approved 0W-40 oils on the list and Rotella T6 is one of them.
 

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I am concerned about what I will be doing this winter, as there are only five approved 0W-40 oils on the list and Rotella T6 is one of them.
My experience during the winter of 2020-2021 was the truck had no problems starting at -18F with Rotella T6 5W-40 synthetic.

I too have the Fumoto oil drain valve installed on my truck, and our 3 other vehicles. Installing a Fumoto drain valve is part of the first oil change after acquiring a vehicle.
I have replaced the Ford underbody panel with a Carhart Customs metal underbody panel. It's more of a pain to remove and replace than the OEM panel, but much more durable. I'm thinking of cutting a hole in the metal panel similar to @Dunrollin's, or perhaps creating a small removable panel in the metal underbody panel.
 

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Since we are talking about oil changes I thought I would ask this here -

First off I read how you are supposed to install the cartridge filter onto the housing first - not into the cap. This was very good information for me as my VW TDI’s are different. The spindle where the cartridge is held is actually in the cap itself and not in the body of the filter.

With my 2.7l Ecoboost there is a certain procedure to follow. Before draining the oil you are supposed to first remove the filter cartridge. Or at the very least loosen it enough to allow air in so as not to create a vacuum when the oil drains.

Should this procedure be followed with the 3.0l also?

I’m still waiting for the dealer to get the title on the 2018 I am looking at……
 

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With my 2.7l Ecoboost there is a certain procedure to follow. Before draining the oil you are supposed to first remove the filter cartridge. Or at the very least loosen it enough to allow air in so as not to create a vacuum when the oil drains.

Should this procedure be followed with the 3.0l also?
I'm not identifying a technical reason for loosening the oil filter housing prior to draining oil from the oil pan. Either order would seem to work. If there's a vacuum with draining the oil, the oil fill cap can be removed.
I suspect the service manual instructs to loosen the oil filter housing first to decrease the time required to do an oil and filter change. The oil from the filter housing would be draining into the oil pan while getting under the vehicle. And, with loosening the filter housing first, there would be more time for draining the filter housing while not extending the oil change time required.

And, using a lift, while the vehicle is on the ground, the filter housing is easily accessible, and loosened. Then the vehicle would be raised for access to the oil pan to drain the oil. After waiting a minute or two after removing the oil drain plug, the oil plug can be replaced, the vehicle lowered to the floor. Then the oil filter removed and replaced, and then the new engine oil. If the oil filter is not loosened prior to loosening the oil drain plug, the vehicle would be raised on the lift to open the oil drain plug, then lowered to remove the oil filter, and then raised again to replace the oil drain plug. Not to mention the container the used oil drains into would need to be moved out from under the vehicle and then put back under the vehicle while the oil filter is changed.

Do note, I've not thought this through previously. And, I just educated myself as to a better procedure for oil changes for vehicles with the oil filter accessed from the top of the engine. For almost 50 years, I've always drained the oil and then removed the oil filter. There's a better way with these diesels.
 

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My experience during the winter of 2020-2021 was the truck had no problems starting at -18F with Rotella T6 5W-40 synthetic.

I too have the Fumoto oil drain valve installed on my truck, and our 3 other vehicles. Installing a Fumoto drain valve is part of the first oil change after acquiring a vehicle.
I have replaced the Ford underbody panel with a Carhart Customs metal underbody panel. It's more of a pain to remove and replace than the OEM panel, but much more durable. I'm thinking of cutting a hole in the metal panel similar to @Dunrollin's, or perhaps creating a small removable panel in the metal underbody panel.
I agree that Rotella will have no problem when starting a vehicle at -20F. Ford only specifies 0W-40 below -20 deg F. I run Rotella T6 5W-40 in my Duramax. When you get down around -35F - -45F, the truck will still start without being plugged in, but the first 5 seconds of running sounds like there in no oil in the engine at all. A block heater helps, but it's not always an option. I'll be driving the F-150 home next month and will see what I can track down when I cross through the Yukon. Canadians seem to have a better supply chain for cold weather oil than Alaskans. Most of the chain stores in Alaska seem to stock whatever is for sale in Seattle.
 

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Do note, I've not thought this through previously. And, I just educated myself as to a better procedure for oil changes for vehicles with the oil filter accessed from the top of the engine. For almost 50 years, I've always drained the oil and then removed the oil filter. There's a better way with these diesels.
OK - this brings another question....

With my VW TDI's I use an oil extractor so an oil/filter change can be done all from the top.

I found that is impossible with the 2.7l due to how the dipstick tube is situated as shown in the pic:

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Notice the dipstick tube on the left - impossible to get an extractor tube down to the sump.

Please note that once every 3-4 oil changes I will pull the oil drain plug just to be sure there are no parts or sludge laying at the bottom of the sump.

So can the 3.0l diesel use an oil extractor? Or is the setup similar to the 2.7l gas engine?
 

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