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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I have a 2018 F150 3.0 diesel and am looking to delete the def, egr, etc, and tune. I saw a few threads on here but can't seem to contact the guy in Alberta before doing some kind of introduction here I think...

My warranty is up and I want to delete and tune and people's experience here seems like a good place to start asking these questions. This is my first diesel and I have heard guys for a while talking about their delete stuff and it sounds like if you do it right and the tech knows what he's doing then it's the right way to go. I've also heard from the same guys that you need to make sure it's done right or things can get south if the guy screws it up at all...

What's your experience or opinion on this?
Thanks!!
 

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Since you live in Canada, I say go for it. Looks like you’ll gain some extra ponies in the process. I wish the US would wise up and see the light on this issue. The EGR system will cause failures at some point. Don’t understand why they feedback the unfiltered exhaust back into the intake. I guess it would be more challenging to run a feedback line from further back behind the DPF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dijit, yeah the more I dig into this, the more it seems like it's the smart thing to do. Delete the EGR and all that and also gain a bit of power and maybe better mileage. Most important though is if this will prevent having those engine issues that everyone mentions. As far as actually being 'allowed' to do this, it's certainly not something our increasingly authoritarian gov't is on board with and would ever allow but they've got much bigger fish to fry anyways...
 

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Since you live in Canada, I say go for it. Looks like you’ll gain some extra ponies in the process. I wish the US would wise up and see the light on this issue. The EGR system will cause failures at some point. Don’t understand why they feedback the unfiltered exhaust back into the intake. I guess it would be more challenging to run a feedback line from further back behind the DPF.
The newer eco diesel and duramax's pull from behind the dpf, although the low pressure loop is only used for cruising etc, they still have a high pressure egr loop that is used when you need power and pressures are higher.
 

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The newer eco diesel and duramax's pull from behind the dpf, although the low pressure loop is only used for cruising etc, they still have a high pressure egr loop that is used when you need power and pressures are higher.
I have been perplexed by that one. This application is the only modern small diesel that I am aware of that does not use a low pressure EGR after the DPF. My 2016 Touareg 3.0L has an HP and LP EGR. Even the 3.0L Lion Range Rover has high and low pressure EGR. On the other hand none of the HD pick-ups have the dual pressure systems (that I am aware of).

I am probably the lone defender of EGR on this forum. For one, I like clean air, but a secondary function is EGR passing through an EGR cooler is that it is one of the fastest ways to get heat in the cabin and get the engine to operating temperature. Both are a big deal of those of us in really cold climates. As for maintenance, I noticed surprisingly little fouling of the intake on my 2004 Jetta. I did clean the intake on my Duramax when I had things apart for injector replacement at 180,000 miles. And the EGR makes routine maintenance work on that particular vehicle really difficult, so there's that. For the most part, they are seamless. My sister owns a 1999 TDI Beetle that she bought new. She does not really maintain the car, I'm sure she has no idea what EGR is or that her car is equipped with an EGR system, but 23 years later, that thing just keeps chugging along.
 

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It’s obvious that VW knows what they’re doing regarding the EGR. I suffered thru two EGR recalls and a nasty coolant leak out of the bottom of the EGR. If I hadn’t had these unfortunate events then I’d probably be on your side as well @beaker. Btw, that EGR was really really full of ash with about 12,000 miles. And it was a new replacement. Hope for everyone’s (don’t forget me!) sake that it lasts for 23 years.
 

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It’s obvious that VW knows what they’re doing regarding the EGR. I suffered thru two EGR recalls and a nasty coolant leak out of the bottom of the EGR. If I hadn’t had these unfortunate events then I’d probably be on your side as well @beaker. Btw, that EGR was really really full of ash with about 12,000 miles. And it was a new replacement. Hope for everyone’s (don’t forget me!) sake that it lasts for 23 years.
100% agree. The DPF on my Silverado is nearing 200,000 miles and like all manufacturers, is considered by General Motors to be a consumable part. Once "consumption" happens at a cost of $3,300 if it was available (but is on indefinite back order), I wonder what my resolution will be. I run my finger insider the tailpipe every month to see if I need to start looking for a replacement. When that time comes, I could absolutely see why someone might justify that their vehicle does not measurably contribute to black carbon in the atmosphere. Ford does not help things by covering the DPF only up to 24,000 miles regardless of the extended warranty coverage that you buy, if if interpret their coverage correctly. I truly would love for someone to prove me wrong.

The EGR recalls on the F-150 are an engineering miss on Ford's part. The EGR cooler leak, on the other hand, is not uncommon. Most manufacturers including Ford, Volkswagen, and others, have paid for recalls due to leaks. My observation is that EGRs are a very difficult application and prone to leaks, but that manufacturers have mostly learned how to make them reasonably reliable (F-150 excluded?)
 
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