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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
OK, Very long post about my journey to correct the loss of the oil filter stopper- the rubber $2 part on a metal spring that seals oil into the filter housing until you remove the filter. Once you pull the filter out the oil immediately drains and it make filter changes easy. If the stopper is damaged or missing there is a problem. In its worst case it results in "LOW OIL PRESSURE" warnings, especially at stoplights with a hot engine. In my case I did a temporary repair and the only symptom was a slow buildup of oil pressure on startup. It was only 3 to 5 seconds but it was noticeable.

There is only 1 solution Ford recognizes, and if their techs screw up and install the filter incorrectly (like I did) they will put in a new oil cooler and filter housing (Ford part # FW9Z 6881 A. The parts cost is less than $150 (more on that below) but labor runs as much as 8 hours as they have to do extensive top engine disassembly.

NOTE: Disclaimer- Ford wants the whole assembly replaced, if you do as I did you may incur a problem down the road with your warranty. Do anything I do at your own risk.

My idea was to buy the cooler-filter assembly and just transfer the stopper and spring to my truck. I also acquired a new filter canister and some beautiful metal parts. Interestingly they are labeled Jaguar-Land Rover so that alone should increase the value of my truck (sarcasm).

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Here is what concerned me- the delay of up to 5 seconds before the oil pressure gauge jumped to 20 psi. Here is a short clip showing this issue- you will need volume up to hear the engine start.


Here is the same view after the new stopper was installed.


Now, here is the biggest problem with this repair. Finding the part. First I ordered it from Tasca, 2 weeks later they refunded my money and canceled the order. Next was two different ebay vendors. Same thing, two weeks and a refund from each. Global parts shortage, national backorder. Finally found one at Lakeland Ford, $111.62. (On a side note, Fed Ex delivered it but placed the box under my rear tire, almost crushed it!)

If you are still here, next we will do the step by step. First, carefully remove the spring and stopper from your new oil filter housing. I used 2 pry tools and great care, you do not want to bend the "X" that holds the spring onto the filter stud.

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Next remove the old spring from your truck using the same tools.

Next carefully place the new spring into place in your filter housing. I used a socket to carefully push it into place.

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At this point I would recommend you make sure the spring is up to allow oil to drain and it is on the stud properly. I actually used a few taps of a hammer on the socket extension to drive it home.

The socket applies equal pressure on the spring as you mount it on the stud.

That is all there is to it. I wish we could just order the spring and stopper assembly separately but that doesn't seem to be an option at this time. And as always, prevention is better than repairs, read the manual before you do as I did and screw up the stopper in the first place.
 

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Great work again Doug!

Still baffles me how Ford thinks replacing the entire Oil cooler/filter assembly (along with all of the injectors and associated had lines that need to be removed to get to the assembly) is required, when selling just the brass ring w/stopper installed or just the rubber stopper itself would be so much easier/cheaper.

BTW - the "nub" on the stopper from the new assembly looks much larger and redesigned. Does the part number for the new oil cooler/filter assembly have a letter suffix? Letter suffixes at the end of any Ford part number indicates a revision to the original part. If so, then I view this as an admission that Ford knows the "nub" is a real issue.

Thank you for photo-documenting all of this = another great contribution to the forums!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! I had my old damaged one around for a long time but finally can't seem to find it. That is why I took photos of the new one. The new one has the number 19 molded into it but I can't find anything like it on the net.

The part # is FW9Z 6881 A so I can't tell if it is a revision. I have seen the last letter as a B or C, but I am not sure about A if it is a revision or the original.

Anyway, now I have 2 oil filter plastic "cans" and a brand new filter. Life is good. :)

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@STIAJW Yes, in two very distinct ways. First, instead of the 3-5 second delay before the oil pressure gauge goes to 20 psi it is almost instant. Second, I have about 10 psi more pressure than before.

I was surprised how much that silly stopper affects the oil.
 

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@Dunrollin,
Thanks for the update. Without that anti-drainback stopper, the oil has another path of least resistance while the engine is running probably shunting a not insignificant portion of the high-pressure oil from where it's supposed to go. Not too surprising the oil pressure is higher while the engine is running.
I remain appalled that Ford / Land Rover / Jaguar would design an engine with such a significant failure mode.
 

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@Dunrollin,
Thanks for the update. Without that anti-drainback stopper, the oil has another path of least resistance while the engine is running probably shunting a not insignificant portion of the high-pressure oil from where it's supposed to go. Not too surprising the oil pressure is higher while the engine is running.
I remain appalled that Ford / Land Rover / Jaguar would design an engine with such a significant failure mode.
AND, to get punked into installing the new filter incorrectly since it comes out firmly in the removed filter canister. (Guilty as charged!!). Thanks Doug for another blockbuster write up and being a trail blazer.
 

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@STIAJW Yes, in two very distinct ways. First, instead of the 3-5 second delay before the oil pressure gauge goes to 20 psi it is almost instant. Second, I have about 10 psi more pressure than before.

I was surprised how much that silly stopper affects the oil.
It would be really sweet to be able to just install the rubber nub into the original spring without removal. I realize it would be tough to do this since I struggle with just removing the filter canister. I’d probably drop a host of tools and parts in there because,…it’s what I do.
 

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@Dunrollin,
It appears the oil filter adapter on our Ford engine is the same part as the oil cooler on some Land Rover and Jaguar engines.
I've been trying to determine who the OEM manufacturer is for this oil filter adapter / oil cooler. No luck, yet.
I may send an email or inquiry to a supplier or two . . . and wondering if I may use a couple of your pictures with my inquiry to illustrate the part we're looking for (the black rubber nub)?
Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks for the kind comment dijit. I do wish we could purchase the rubber part itself.

There isn't too much worry about dropping something into the engine. As you can see from this photo the drain hole the stopper covers is very small and seems to send the oil into a journal in the cooler. It is shown with a red circle. There are two things I think are inlets but dropping anything in those would be hard to do as they seem to be closed until operating pressure opens them. They have red arrows pointing at them.

@STIAJW sure, hope anything can be of help. I am pretty sure Mann makes the unit. I have searched their catalogs with no good results. Hope you can solve this one for us! In the Land Rover it is the TD6 diesel engine.
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I think the Jaguar version is a twin turbo but I can't find a photo of it. This is the best I can do.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@STIAJW I looked at the assembly closely and found a Mann number that might help you. It is Mann-Hummel 11 257 72 S01. See below.
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ETA I just saw on the internet that Mann Hummel is going under:
The manufacturing operations are expected to be fully closed by the end of 2022.
MANN+HUMMEL remains active with all its business offerings and services in the United Kingdom.Nov 24, 2020
 

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Seems like it would have been a better design to make the filter longer with a rubber base. This base would make contact with the drain hole after tightening and would drain during removal. It also seems like if you do booger up the “nub” you need to plug the hole for the engine’s sake. During filter removal just deal with the extra oil. Could be a good exercise for someone with a 3D printer. Get the 3D file and see if you could get someone to manufacture a batch. Get one made with the topside rubber piece about 3 inches long. It would make it easier to handle, insert, and pull thru the nub hole. Trim after removal. This is a simple “mold” item with high heat rubber. Molds for electronic piece parts run about $10k.
 

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Seems like it would have been a better design to make the filter longer with a rubber base. This base would make contact with the drain hole after tightening and would drain during removal. It also seems like if you do booger up the “nub” you need to plug the hole for the engine’s sake. During filter removal just deal with the extra oil. Could be a good exercise for someone with a 3D printer. Get the 3D file and see if you could get someone to manufacture a batch. Get one made with the topside rubber piece about 3 inches long. It would make it easier to handle, insert, and pull thru the nub hole. Trim after removal. This is a simple “mold” item with high heat rubber. Molds for electronic piece parts run about $10k.
Excellent description of the issue! I would think a stubby pan head bolt with an appropriately sized rubber washer could be inserted (not threaded) into the drain hole under the spring. The filter would hold the spring down against the top of the bolt to keep it from coming out. Thoughts?
 

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Excellent description of the issue! I would think a stubby pan head bolt with an appropriately sized rubber washer could be inserted (not threaded) into the drain hole under the spring. The filter would hold the spring down against the top of the bolt to keep it from coming out. Thoughts?
Plugging the drain hole under the rubber stopper should be relatively straight forward. I've considered that alternative to the problem, but haven't figured out a reliable and long-term durable method of providing the ability to suck out the oil from inside the filter housing for an oil filter change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
All these ideas are great but let me add one unknown.

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When you unscrew the black plastic top, how much oil is in there? Does it fill up during the 7,500 mile oil change interval or does air stay in there? If the oil goes above the metal it will be a big mess when you unscrew the cap.

The metal bottom portion is only 2" deep, the plastic part has 3 to 5 inches of oil capacity that could drain all over the engine.

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If I understand the mechanics, as you unscrew the housing the tension on the spring is gradually released allowing the oil to drain fast enough so that no oil seeps out (if the oil level is verily above the metal housing) during a typically oil change. (Or do you need to loosen the housing filter first and wait before removal to allow oil to sufficiently drain?) So the key is to have the rubber washer attached to the spring. Maybe take the nub-less old rubber washer (or equivalent replacement washer) and drill a very small hole through the center. Use a dremel to make a neat recessed hole in the bottom of the washer to accommodate a small pan head bolt which is then threaded through the bottom of the washer AND spring hole and secured in place on top of the spring with a nylon nut. Just thinking out loud here for a solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If I understand the mechanics, as you unscrew the housing the tension on the spring is gradually released allowing the oil to drain fast enough so that no oil seeps out (if the oil level is verily above the metal housing) during a typically oil change.
That is correct, and it drains fast enough you don't see it happening. The plastic cap unscrews very slow due to the tight fit of the O ring so it is probably 1 minute from beginning to remove the cap until it is ready to lift off.

Your idea of the rubber washer is exactly what I did as a temporary fix. It would have been a permanent fix had it not leaked down overnight. I used a faucet washer- the tapered kind. Looking back I guess that is where I had my leak, a flat washer would probably have worked. Another downside to my temporary fix was the nut holding the screw and washer left a dimple on the filter, probably not an issue but over time I wouldn't want that.
 

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That is correct, and it drains fast enough you don't see it happening. The plastic cap unscrews very slow due to the tight fit of the O ring so it is probably 1 minute from beginning to remove the cap until it is ready to lift off.

Your idea of the rubber washer is exactly what I did as a temporary fix. It would have been a permanent fix had it not leaked down overnight. I used a faucet washer- the tapered kind. Looking back I guess that is where I had my leak, a flat washer would probably have worked. Another downside to my temporary fix was the nut holding the screw and washer left a dimple on the filter, probably not an issue but over time I wouldn't want that.
You do know there’s someone somewhere that has a whole bag of these nubs at their desk.
 
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