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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, in this new f'ed up economy of product shortages my usual dealer for oil changes, whom I have personally trained on how to perform the oil change on the 3.0L Powerstroke, is out of oil filters and the specified oil. Therefore, I'm forced to go to another Ford dealer for the service. As is now required before I bring the truck in, I have the obligatory conversation with the Service Mgr to see if they are at all familiar with the engine and ofcourse they are not and have no idea about the "nub". I explained the procedure to him and told him that there is actually a Ford printed document that outlines it. To which he says, "great can you send me a copy of it?" So I know someone on the forum has it if you could so kindly fwd a copy to me so I can augment the service departments "continuing education" credits....
 

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I looked in the 2018 and 2020 F150 Owners Manuals and don't see it. I looked back to when member Kval (a Ford mechanic) first brought this to our attention in December of 2020 in this post. He stated
Here is proper procedure according to the workshop manual. I know it looks easy and ask why am i even posting this but i know some people usually install the oil filer into the cap then install the cap. This causes the filter to twist with the cap which may or may not wear the top of the plug (not really sure but i guess that might happen). Instructions say to install the filter then install the cap with a new oring and lubricated. This may prevent this issue from happening?
He also offered the photos of the proper procedure from the shop manual.

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Here’s my reasoning of why it’s important to install the new oil filter element onto the aluminum post inside the oil filter housing prior to screwing on the plastic oil filter cap.

But, first a bit of info regarding the oil filter system based on my experiences with changing the oil and oil filter on the 3.0, and from looking at a replacement 3.0 oil filter assembly.

The oil filter element has a friction fit onto the aluminum post inside the oil filter housing, and the oil filter has a friction fit onto the base of the plastic sleeve inside the plastic oil filter cap. The friction fit of the oil filter element to the aluminum post is weaker than the friction fit to the plastic sleeve in the oil filter cap – that’s evidenced by the oil filter element always stuck inside the plastic cap upon removing that plastic cap for an oil filter change. And, the plastic sleeve inside the plastic oil filter cap which the oil filter element slides onto can be rotated relatively easily inside the plastic cap.

Regarding the infamous anti-drainback rubber valve, or “nub”, inside the oil filter housing below the oil filter; it’s held in place only by the small rubber “button” that extends through the metal spring. When the oil filter is removed, the high point is that button that’s holding the rubber anti-drainback valve in place.

Apparently, when the oil filter is installed incorrectly by first inserting a new oil filter element into the plastic oil filter cap, and then screwing in the oil filter cap, the oil filter element can rotate enough to cause the anti-drainback valve, the nub, to be dislodged out of the metal spring.

Thus, Ford advises the proper procedure for oil filter installation is to place the new oil filter element firmly onto the aluminum post inside the oil filter housing. Then, screw on the plastic oil filter cap (with a new lubricated o-ring).

With this oil filter installation method, the oil filter likely doesn’t rotate on top of the anti-drainback valve because of the friction fit of the oil filter element onto the aluminum post, and because the center plastic sleeve in the oil filter cap can rotate as the cap is screwed down. Actually, the plastic oil filter cap rotates as it’s screwed down, and the center plastic sleeve inside the cap does not rotate as the oil filter element is pressed onto the base of the center plastic sleeve inside the plastic cap.

But, what about when the oil filter is being removed, could the rubber anti-drainback valve be dislodged then? Possibly.

The mechanics of removing the oil filter: When the plastic oil filter cap is being unscrewed, the oil filter element is pulled directly up off the aluminum base for approximately 3/8” before it’s possible for it to rotate. That’s because the friction fit of the plastic sleeve base inside the oil filter cap is stronger than the friction fit of the base of the aluminum post, and the plastic sleeve can remain stationary as the plastic cap is unscrewed. Also, the base of the oil filter element that contacts the rubber anti-drainback valve is well lubricated with oil. Pulling up the oil filter element by unscrewing the plastic oil filter cap also allows the rubber anti-drainback valve to open by the action of the metal spring, thus draining the oil in the filter and housing.

Thinking of these mechanics of removal and replacement of the oil filter element, one good thing we can do is visually check to see if the rubber anti-drainback valve is in its correct position prior to installing the new oil filter element. We also can be relatively confident installing the new oil filter element by pressing it onto the aluminum post first is not likely to dislodge the rubber anti-drainback valve.

On the flip side, if the anti-drainback valve is not in its correct position, with the parts now available from Ford, a fix should be relatively quick and inexpensive.

My two photos, below, show the anti-drainback valve in its correct location.
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This is why I love these forums = Thanks to @STIAJW for the detailed explanation on what comes down to a 50/50 decision influenced by where the old filter is during removal. One might think: What difference could there be between on-the-post vs. in-the-cup? Still amazed a $0.25 piece of rubber can result in $4-$5K of repairs = definition of bad design
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, in this new f'ed up economy of product shortages my usual dealer for oil changes, whom I have personally trained on how to perform the oil change on the 3.0L Powerstroke, is out of oil filters and the specified oil. Therefore, I'm forced to go to another Ford dealer for the service. As is now required before I bring the truck in, I have the obligatory conversation with the Service Mgr to see if they are at all familiar with the engine and ofcourse they are not and have no idea about the "nub". I explained the procedure to him and told him that there is actually a Ford printed document that outlines it. To which he says, "great can you send me a copy of it?" So I know someone on the forum has it if you could so kindly fwd a copy to me so I can augment the service departments "continuing education" credits....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So, the new dealer did the oil change and it went well up until it came time to check out and pay... Normally the oil change is around $120-130 given the expensive 5w30 "special oil" which most dealers charge around $9-10/quart. This dealer TRIED to charge me $180 for 7 Qts of oil. I guess I should have expected some skullduggery since as I was waiting I walked around the lot looking at the new car inventory. They generally had every new car up-charged 50% or more above MSRP. F150 XL's at $70k+, Bronco Raptor $150K!!! I told the service guy after we had the oil price "mistake" corrected that customers do have memories... So, I will never go back to that dealer ever again, for any reason. IMO, dealers like this are just hastening their own demise as ordering direct from the factory and other dealer bypass buying options are going to grow in popularity.

I guess I need to look at devices to make home oil changes possible for the mechanically challenged. This cost for a simple oil change is unsustainable.
 

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Thanks for the followup report. Dealer high prices is a thing right now. Way off topic but I ordered a new Ford Maverick hybrid XL 2 months ago. I have no idea if I will actually ever see it but supposedly it will cost $25,790 delivered with all taxes and such. I was just watching a video on new Mavericks in dealer stock and this one came up:

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Almost $20,000 over MSRP. I prefer to pay MSRP or less.

Back on topic- again thanks and now you have up to 10,000 miles to go before you have to have it again. Seriously, I think this is one of the easiest engines to change oil but you do have to get under it to do it. Suction isn't an option I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the followup report. Dealer high prices is a thing right now. Way off topic but I ordered a new Ford Maverick hybrid XL 2 months ago. I have no idea if I will actually ever see it but supposedly it will cost $25,790 delivered with all taxes and such. I was just watching a video on new Mavericks in dealer stock and this one came up:

View attachment 2776

Almost $20,000 over MSRP. I prefer to pay MSRP or less.

Back on topic- again thanks and now you have up to 10,000 miles to go before you have to have it again. Seriously, I think this is one of the easiest engines to change oil but you do have to get under it to do it. Suction isn't an option I think.
I tried using the vacuum pump method first oil change but there is a baffle in the oil pan that prevents the suction tube from hitting the bottom so it's not an option, unfortunately.
 
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