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Thanks to all for the information regarding oil pressure problems caused by displacing the rubber nub inside the oil filter housing. I'm doing the 3rd oil change on my 2019 3.0 and took the time to check the status of the oil nub.
Fortunately, it appears the nub is where it belongs - woo hoo!
I'll be following the suggestions in this thread - applying oil to the bottom side of the filter prior to sliding the filter onto the post inside the filter housing. And, then installing the plastic oil filter cap.
My crude arrow in the picture points to the desired location of the anti-drain back nub inside the filter housing.
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@STIAJW - great picture! Nothing better than another real world picture from a real owner = you earn a like from me!

Since you are a DIYer, can I ask an honest question: Prior to reading this thread, how did you install the oil filter on your previous two (2) oil changes? Were you aware of the proper installation technique discussed here? Or did you click the filter into the cup first and then screw the cup into the oil filter assembly base on the engine?

Not trying to shame you or anyone else, as I think this is a HUGE issue with this engine for any DIYer, because it is such a simple mistake to make. I don't wrench on my F150 PSD (since I purchased a PremiumCare Maintenance ESP) but if I were a DIYer, I have previously admitted I would have probably clicked the filter into the cup and be having this same issue...

Thanks again for photo-documenting your experience.

#SaveTheNub #SnubTheRub
 

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@jmperlik - With the first oil filter change (fall 2020), I put the new filter in the plastic oil filter canister and then screwed in the assembly. That seemed logical, and a no-brainer - the filter came out with removal of the oil filter canister (cup), so I put the filter in the oil filter canister (cup), carefully line things up when reinstalling, and screwed the canister into place using the torque specs to not overtighten.

With the second oil filter change (Feb. 2021), I had read this post and realized what seems logical and a no-brainer is, in fact, not the way to install a new oil filter. So, for the second filter, I installed the filter onto the post of the engine, and then installed the plastic filter canister over it and tightened it to spec.

This third time, following suggestions in this post, I smeared grease on the top and bottom of the filter prior to installing the filter on the post in the engine. Then placed the oil canister (cup) carefully in place, and tightened to spec.

It is amazing, and disappointing, that Ford would design something so important to oil pressure at low engine RPMs that's so easy to inadvertently get negatively affected by oil filter installation. Even a simple downward 6 mm section of the spring to recess where the rubber nub is attached would prevent the nub from being pushed out of place during filter installation.
 

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I replaced my sender and added a mechanical gauge. Seemed to have fixed it until the long trip I am on pulling a 24 ft camper. What I am finding out is any time I am over 200F and come to a stop it beeps. Just a tap on the accelerator and it goes away. Interestingly, I have let it go on a few times and the gauge never drops below 10psi.

Normally it idles at about 12 psi.
where is the sender on the 3.0 diesel?
 

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Law dog

where is the sender on the 3.0 diesel?
It is easy to find, right on top of the engine near the front. You have to remove the plastic fascia first.
2338

Mine looks different from yours as I still have a tee below the sender for a mechanical gauge but it is the large silver thing with the connector on top.
 

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As long as the rubber stopper is covering the drain hole when the spring is compressed, it should be good to go. If it was just deflected, and not ripped out, it's probably fine. I would check it yourself to be sure.
Why couldn't you use a small round rubber bumper similar to the ones on the older glove box door? They have the tail to pull them through the hole.
 

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It is easy to find, right on top of the engine near the front. You have to remove the plastic fascia first. View attachment 2338
Mine looks different from yours as I still have a tee below the sender for a mechanical gauge but it is the large silver thing with the connector on top.
I removed that sender and screwed in a gauge. The manual gauge never showed any pressure but the dash gauge (original) showed pressure when I started the engine. The wires weren't hooked up to anything so I figured I had removed the wrong sender
 

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@Carroll Vaughn You may have nailed it with the glove box door bumper. That seems to be the same size. My only concern is if the rubber is strong enough to hold up to the heat and oil. All the rubber does is plug the drain while the filter is screwed in and open the drain when the filter is removed. I really like your common sense solution to this.

The mechanical gauge you installed should have worked fine. Mine is still in place and works as intended.
 

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@Carroll Vaughn You may have nailed it with the glove box door bumper. That seems to be the same size. My only concern is if the rubber is strong enough to hold up to the heat and oil. All the rubber does is plug the drain while the filter is screwed in and open the drain when the filter is removed. I really like your common sense solution to this.

The mechanical gauge you installed should have worked fine. Mine is still in place and works as intended.
The rubber needs to be a Buna-N or similar designation. I may just soak one of these in motor oil for a few days and see if it holds up. I think Ford needs to spend some money training their engineers or just hire a bunch of retired farm boys or sawmillers.
 

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Might anyone have one of those little black rubber nub anti-drain back plugs that could take measurements? Would be nice to know the diameter of the rubber "shaft" that goes through the spring, the diameter of the rubber "plug" that stops the oil from draining, and the height of the "plug" part. That way, someone could look for an existing part that might work.
 

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Hi,

European user of the 2.7 litre version of your engine in a Land Rover Discovery.

From European experience of this engine, I would be very wary of running the engine with low oil pressure. European versions of the engine have a known issue of fracturing the crank (rumour mill states this has affected OOM 1% of cars). The exact cause is up for debate and depends on who you talk too. Either way the outcome can result in a bad day. Sometimes the main bearings are extruded, other times there is some wear, but generally bearing OK, but crank snapped, typically towards the front of the engine where it has thinner webs between the main and big end bearings. it has happened at low mileages for some (<50k), but seems more common above 100K

We tend to fix the problem by buying an old Jaguar with the same engine and fitting the engine to the discovery as the Jaguars are more lightly loaded (no towing) and tend to be cheap. A number of folks have stripped the 'good' jaguar engines and found 'worn bearings', typically like this - these are out of my 2.7 litre Lion V6 after 145K miles in a Land Rover discovery (you have improved ‘splutter’ coated bearings that are a bronze colour):
2340

My take on life:
  1. Marginal oil pressure causes poor lubrication of bearings when under load - see later
  2. Bearings start to wear (worse bearing above has 0.005mm of white (green in this case) metal loss. Sounds like nothing but calculate out the change in clearance and its a 13% increase.
  3. Oil pressure gets lower, wear rate increases
  4. Crank is not as stiff radially as it could be due to thin crank webs and crank starts to deflect more than design on each revolution at main bearing 2
My personal take on what happens next is either:

  • If you have any defect in the crank at the high stress point at main bearing 2 it fatigues and then fails (breaks) under high load
  • If you have a defect free crank the wear continues, and you knock out/extrude a main bearing until it spins - this blocks the oil flow to the main and associated big end - engine seizes.

Example of a snapped crank from a European engine:

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I would not personally drive my car anywhere if the oil light has flickered. If the oil pressure is low because a dealer fitted a oil filter incorrectly I would be having him inspect the main & big ends. At the minimum I would be looking for agreement that if the crank snaps later that Ford pick up the bill. I'd be saying the same to the monkey's that filled it with the wrong oil as well.

Hope that this is of use/interest. I have put some more info below if you want to read on/want too debate.

Adrian



Why does the oil pressure get low??? Well, I think there are a multitude of causes, in fact it should be titled 'why is the bearing oil film too thin hence resulting in wear of the bearing(s)':
  • I think the bearings are relatively highly loaded (bearings not as wide as they could be) as the engine was designed so that it would fit transversely across the front of a Citroen car (my opinion). Think this drives the stupidly thin crank webs either side of main bearing 2 (2nd in from the right) - see crank picture below. I personally believe this means that it can't tolerate defects in the engine as well as an old school diesel engine could.
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  • Oil filter 'nubbin' - not come across that one myself. But we do know that you fit the filter 1st, then the cap.

  • Oil pump wear:
No personal experience of this. But have stripped 2 used pumps and not found significant wear. That said we tend to fit new oil pumps at every timing belt change. But this is driven by fact the oil pump carries the belt tensioner - early designs were weak and if the timing belt was fitted too tight the idler would fall off the pump casing with bad consequences. New pumps have an improved design (your engines will have this from new).​
Interestingly the Ford F150 pump has a 11% higher capacity compared to the pumps in the 2.7 litre and early 3.0 litre versions. All the engines have the same main and big end bearing sizes.​

  • Oil pump solenoid malfunction?
Your pump has a small electrically operated solenoid on the side of it. Not worked out the function of this yet (it’s different from the European 2.7 and early 3.0 engines), but I would be asking my dealer if it was defective and what issues that could cause if I had low oil pressure. See picture below (this is a pump for the Ford F-150 3.0 that I have bought and imported to the UK), solenoid is at bottom:​
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The solenoid appears to be able to divert the oil flow to one/both of the two spill back valves (earlier pumps only have one spillback(relief) valve and no solenoid. I have stripped the Ford F150 pump and marked up my understanding of it below:​
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  • Oil viscosity degradation reducing the oil load carrying capability
    • Over heating? – never heard of this being an issue. But then you have a very high towing capacity on the F150 compared to European cars, so you might be working the engines harder. I’d watch coolant temp increases.
    • Missed or extended oil changes (I would personally change the oil more frequently than Ford recommend, or get an oil sample taken.
    • Wrong oil
    • Diesel in oil causing reduced oil viscosity and hence bearing load capability
      • Injector issues - we use OBD port tools to check the injector balance and hence determine if the injector volumes are trying to compensate for a leaking injector. Most UK owners has an OBD port tool – look at Gap Diagnostics ‘IID tool’. We can trend any sensors over time on a phone/Ipad etc. You can then turn up to a dealer with a trend, fault codes, etc…Stops them fobbing you off.
      • Exhaust DPF blockage causing excessive regen attempts - engine injects diesel into cylinder at bottom of combustion stroke so that the unburnt fuel gets through to the DPF and burns of the carbon. This wets the bores and gives you engine oil dilution with diesel and reduced oil viscosity. If the DPF is blocked the regen cycle is over long, repeated causing excess diesel ingress into the oil
      • Failed glow plugs - Bore wetting on start-up resulting in engine oil dilution with diesel. The glow plugs can size in the heads, so no one likes changing them in case they snap off. On the LR discovery if you need to remove the cylinder heads you need to remove the body - ££££/$$$$. Folk poor hot water on the air inlet sensor prestart to cheat the ECU. I think it gives you engine oil dilution and leads to engine failure. But your cars are new enough for this not to be an issue.
 

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@Breg90 - wow! Fantastic write-up and photo-documentation! Thanks for sharing your experiences, as Europe has had this 6-cyl Diesel "Lion" engine for 10+ years now in the DLR Discovery models. Us newer F150 PSD owners here are no more than 3 years old, so we should be looking to you for what long term ownership issues you are seeing and what we should expect with this new (to us) engine platform.

While I agree no one should be running with any "Low Oil Pressure" warnings going off, we are kinda caught in a Catch-22 here, not knowing if it a real engine problem or someone got sloppy during the last oil change and didn't follow the correct oil filter change procedure.

My personal opinion is that Ford needs to issue a TSB on this topic and allow just the rubber stopper to be ordered individually in their parts system, as replacing the entire oil filter housing assembly (along with 6+ shop hours) is a huge waste of Ford and owners' time and money all because of $0.25 part that needs to be redesigned.

Thanks again for the thorough and detailed write-up on this topic and a looking glass into what we can expect 5+ years down the road from now.
 

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I really appreciate your experience and research. This is great information that will help all of us in taking care of our diesels.

Apparently Ford learned from your experiences with crankshafts. When they adapted the engine for use in the F150 they upgraded both the shaft and the bearings, as noted in this article:
This is coupled with a stronger crankshaft and bearing alloy material.
Interesting article at idpartsblog.

I think Ford has specified thinner weight oils in the US to try to achieve government mandates. Most of us are using oils approved for "severe use" and I think that will allow us to extend the service life over the 10w30. Your experience with the oil pumps is excellent- we have very little experience with them so this will assist us.

Edited to add: Here is another reference to the crankshaft issue:
The 3.0l Power Stroke engine for a reason has new revised crankshaft and bearings. Ford's 3.0L diesel engines had serious problems with bursting crankshafts and quick wear on crankshaft bearings. There are several possible causes - a design mistake, insufficient oil pump performance, improper oil, untimely and incomplete oil change. The reason is most likely a complex of the above factors. Ford has done some work with related components and only time will tell how successful it is.
. From MotorReviewer
 
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While I agree no one should be running with any "Low Oil Pressure" warnings going off, we are kinda caught in a Catch-22 here, not knowing if it a real engine problem or someone got sloppy during the last oil change and didn't follow the correct oil filter change procedure.
Jmperlik,

Sorry if I didn't make myself clear - in my view once light comes on stop car. Do not drive again. They don't like low oil pressure. The dealer can fanny about all he/she wants, until they prove its a dodgy sensor the pressure is low. The more its run with low pressure the more bearing wear you will get. BUT the failure will likely be in the future and you will likely struggle to prove the causal link with low oil pressure in 10,000 miles. Hence the dealer can fob you off knowing if he gets it wrong he will likely not pay..... In a car under warranty I'd pull over at the side of the road, request the vehicle be collected on a flat bed and not move it an inch.

I also think if the nubbin is damaged you actually have low oil pressure......

Adrian
 

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I really appreciate your experience and research. This is great information that will help all of us in taking care of our diesels.

Apparently Ford learned from your experiences with crankshafts. When they adapted the engine for use in the F150 they upgraded both the shaft and the bearings, as noted in this article: Interesting article at idpartsblog.

I think Ford has specified thinner weight oils in the US to try to achieve government mandates. Most of us are using oils approved for "severe use" and I think that will allow us to extend the service life over the 10w30. Your experience with the oil pumps is excellent- we have very little experience with them so this will assist us.

Edited to add: Here is another reference to the crankshaft issue: . From MotorReviewer
Dunrollin:
From left to right:

2.7 main lower (green), Ford F150 main lower, 2.7 main upper (white metal), Ford F150 main upper

2345


Think that the same bearings are used now over here in what's referred to as the Gen 2 3.0 - we differentiate it as it has twin turbos over the earlier single turbo's.

Adrian
 

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@jmperlik - Sorry if I didn't make myself clear - in my view once light comes on stop car. Do not drive again. They don't like low oil pressure. The dealer can fanny about all he/she wants, until they prove its a dodgy sensor the pressure is low. The more its run with low pressure the more bearing wear you will get. BUT the failure will likely be in the future and you will likely struggle to prove the causal link with low oil pressure in 10,000 miles. Hence the dealer can fob you off knowing if he gets it wrong he will likely not pay..... In a car under warranty I'd pull over at the side of the road, request the vehicle be collected on a flat bed and not move it an inch.

I also think if the nubbin is damaged you actually have low oil pressure......

Adrian
Adrian - please don't take my response the wrong way either. I wholeheartedly agree with you about driving with this "Low Oil Pressure" condition. I have the luxury a Ford Protect Extended Maintenance Plan, where my Ford dealer handles all of my service according to the documented maintenance schedule. Luckily I have a solid dealer with a very experienced diesel technician that take very good care of my F150 PSD. Read either of the EGR By-Pass Valve recall threads or even this thread and you'll find a large variability of diesel tech experience across Ford US dealers.

Luckily I have not experienced this "Low Oil Pressure" warning, so I assume that my dealer has been following the correct oil filter installation procedure and my rubber stopper is still intact. There are however several members in this thread who have experienced this problem and have either traded in the their PSD (e.g. @lawdog) or let Ford fire the parts cannon at what is a simple cause if you know what to look for. There are other owners who have encountered this issue, verified that their stopper has been displaced, and haven't done anything beyond maybe using a different oil in the hopes they could make the issue go away.

I also agree with you that if the stopper has been displaced, then the oil lubricating system is not working as designed and could possibly lead to problems in the future. Since you have torn these engines apart down to the the oil pump, perhaps you can explain to all of us exactly what the stopper purpose is for, as I thought I understood but your picture and description of the solenoid and not one but two spill back valves now have me questioning if I truly understand.

From my understanding, the rubber stopper on the bottom of the brass ring acts as a stopper in the drain back hole when the oil filter cartridge is installed, or in other words, when you remove the filter, it allows the oil in the filter cup to drain back into engine sump? as to not make a mess everywhere when you remove the filter cup to change the filter element. In my mind this a what we call in programming a "rare path" that is infrequently used compared to the mainline "hot path" of code -- the filter cup should always be full of oil except for the 0.0001% of the time when you are changing the oil filter cartridge.

Now if someone's stopper is displaced (due to what we believe is improper filter replacement procedure) and they are driving around with the stopper floating around in the bottom of the oil filter assembly, the rubber stopper is not doing its job of plugging off that drain back hole and the oil pump needs to work overtime to keep the filter cup full? Owners here who have experienced this "Low Oil Pressure" warning usually complain it happens at idle, so this makes sense to me.

Based on your Diesel Oil Pump internals picture, I now think I was mistaken in how I assumed things worked in that the broken stopper floating around in the bottom of the oil filter assembly was "getting in the way" of oil going down the drain back hole causing the low oil pressure condition, but I now understand that if the rubber stopper is doing its job, there should be no oil going down this drain back hole. Your picture show the input and outputs for the pump neither of which involve this drain back hole.

Putting all of this together, should we assume that the low oil pressure condition is truly due to low oil pressure because the oil filter cup has lost pressure due to oil draining down thru the drain hole due to the missing stopper? If so, then I agree with your assertion that owners should not be driving their truck in this condition and need to get to their dealer to resolve immediately.

We'd appreciate a detailed explanation of how things work in terms of oil flow and what condition this missing stopper can cause. While you may not have encountered this nub issue on your side of the pond, this definitely is a real issue here in the States with the F150 PSD version of the engine, as documented by the half dozen owners in this thread.

Thanks again for your contribution and for sharing your knowledge and experience on this topic.
 
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Wanted to share my last 48 hours... 2019 went on Wednesday AM for 30K service (Ford ESP) picked it up drove home later that day, about 10 miles to home. Pulled in my driveway while waiting for the garage door to open LOW OIL PRESSURE warning came on at idle.

Lucky for me I belong to this forum and knew about the issues regarding oil change procedure and rubber stopper. So back to Ford and after 3 technicians witnessed the event I left the truck. This morning I sent a detailed e-mail with pics and asked that some one verify the rubber stopper was in place. Just got back from Ford and was met by the service tech and he was holding the rubber stopper in his hand. Here we go round the mulberry bush...
Automotive tire Natural material Oval Tints and shades Synthetic rubber

I am not one for excuses or a CYA answer. This is a Ford dealer, and you can't change the oil correctly in a F150 especially after I had warned you that this was a know issue if procedures on changing the oil were not followed. I don't believe any damage was done, as immediately returned to the dealer and did not drive the truck with this condition.

Take-aways :
  • Make sure that who ever changes the oil understands the procedure
  • If you experience a LOW OIL PRESSURE warning, then
    • Do NOT drive your truck
    • This won't fix itself or "go away" by itself
  • If this does happen, have this service record reflect the condition and fix
A BIG thanks to this forum and those that take the time to share information

I will follow-up as this gets resolved. In the mean time I have my Honda Trail 90 for transportation

Rodney
 

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@RLVoumard - sorry to hear we have yet another forum member stung by a Ford Certified technician.

I strongly believe that a TSB needs to be created for this issue, as even their own employees are causing unnecessary warranty work. I have to believe that the oil filter assembly Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) is burning a hole-in-the-page of the F150 PSD parts manual, as the entire assembly needs to be replaced for a $0.25 rubber stopper.

I need to get my NY State inspection done this month, so I'll be swinging by my dealer next week. While My Service Manager doesn't have this issue with my truck, I am going to implore him to do something on behalf of all F150 PSD owners and save the Ford Motor Company from replacing unnecessary parts and performing warranty work caused by lack of training of Ford employees, specifically having Ford issue a TSB on the correct procedure for changing the oil filter on our trucks.

No guarantees anything will come of this request, but I cannot stand on the sidelines and continue to see the same stupid mistake made by Ford Certified techs causing so much unnecessary grief.

#SaveTheNub #SnubTheRub
 
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