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A TSB is a great idea , and IMO badly needed. In my case I provided the service dept ( earlier on ) the information from this forum about the issue cause by not following procedure.

I was most disappointed by the ." Oh Well it happens attitude" the service manager told me "its really hard to know procedures on everything " So we are a Ford Dealer that just Flies by the seat of its pants on repairs ?? ... It all points to lack of training.
 

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@RLVoumard - sorry to hear we have yet another forum member stung by a Ford Certified technician.

I strongly believe that a TSB needs to be created for this issue, as even their own employees are causing unnecessary warranty work. I have to believe that the oil filter assembly Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) is burning a hole-in-the-page of the F150 PSD parts manual, as the entire assembly needs to be replaced for a $0.25 rubber stopper.

I need to get my NY State inspection done this month, so I'll be swinging by my dealer next week. While My Service Manager doesn't have this issue with my truck, I am going to implore him to do something on behalf of all F150 PSD owners and save the Ford Motor Company from replacing unnecessary parts and performing warranty work caused by lack of training of Ford employees, specifically having Ford issue a TSB on the correct procedure for changing the oil filter on our trucks.

No guarantees anything will come of this request, but I cannot stand on the sidelines and continue to see the same stupid mistake made by Ford Certified techs causing so much unnecessary grief.

#SaveTheNub #SnubTheRub
To me, it would seem both methods would cause the filter to drag on the rubber stopper, but one of the methods will cause more damage than the other. As tight as the filter fits in the upper housing ("cup") center section, it makes me wonder how much good is done by placing the filter into the lower housing first- which is by comparison a loose fit to the filter. By my reckoning, the cup's center section would begin to rotate the filter long before it's fully tightened, dragging the filter across and rubbing it against the rubber stopper nub for a longer period of time than if the filter were installed into the cup. By my guesstimate, the method of installing the filter into the lower housing and then installing the upper cup would then likely end up causing more damage to the rubber stopper than if the filter were installed into the cup first and only made contact on the last turn or so of the cup being tightened down.

But hey, I could be wrong. I've only changed my truck's oil for the last 45k miles since I bought it and not had any issues with oil pressure and there's been no discernible damage to the rubber stopper when I've checked it every oil change.
 

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Agreed - you wouldn't think it should make that big of a difference either way, and I am wondering over time if the nub will fail (regardless of which procedures you use) due to number of oil changes. I still advocate for Ford selling this $0.25 piece of rubber as a separate part....

Wish we could talk to the engineer that developed the procedure @Kval posted from the shop manual = I bet there is some internal testing experiences/stories there that Ford chose not to expose.

At this point I feel like us F150 PSD owners are the only humans left on a planet of zombies, and Ford is coming up with ways to selectively eliminate what F150 PSD owners are left. Two (2) rounds of EGR By-Pass valve recalls took out the first and second wave of owners and now this stupid rubber stopper design is systematically picking off owners one-by-one where Ford is even complicit with their trained techs joining in on the purge. For anyone who's a Danny Boyle fan of the 28 Days/Weeks Later films, this sequel could be named "28 F150 PSD Oil Changes Later"
 

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Well - the last 2 posts have me conserned " is it just a matter of time ? " 100K/5,000 intervals = 20 oil changes . How long before the rubber stopper is damaged no matter how careful or in what order is used. ? The oil cartage has to rub on the top of the rubber stopper at each oil filter change. Ford needs to get involved and address this . I bought what I thought was a solid engine design and a truck I expected to last 100K /10 years.... This issue really has me wondering.

How can we as owners be expected to accept a " bad design " ? and from what I am seeing an expensive fix. Is their a way to force Ford to accept responsibility ? I sure now that this is a discontinued engine we are in a very , very small minority. After the 6.0 liter Power Stroke disaster you would think Ford would be listing/watching. I have a ESP, but this has me thinking do I have Ford do ALL OIL CHANGES and then the responsibility is on them. If owners had to pay for the repairs for a broken rubber stopper would be a $1,500 assembly and 10 hours shop time.

UPDATE ON MY TRUCK:
I have gone right to the service manager and "seem" to have his attention. I was given a loaner ( F150 ) and parts are expected in this Wednesday. I would expect 2 days once the tech begins the job. I was promised the lead diesel tech and that the shop foreman will ride shotgun on the repair.
 

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So my oil cooler was damaged by a dealer oil change back in May. Long story short, it took Ford since then to assemble the parts to replace the oil cooler and I'm waiting incessantly for the dealer to provide a loaner. So problem created diagnosed in May/June potential fix Oct/Nov... I had the oil changed yesterday by the offending dealer but you need to remind or insist to the Service Mgr that a certified mechanic complete the service or in my case yesterday installs the filter, fill the oil, and properly seat the oil filter canister to the proper torque 18ft/lbs. This is key. When it was damaged I watched the Quicklane tech (I use that term loosely) spin the filter on in the canister and over-torque the assembly which all lead to the problem. Oh, I also had to intervene yesterday as I watched one "tech" put the wrong size socket on the oil canister and begin to strip the plastic nut after I TOLD him WHAT SIZE TO USE!

Bottom line, this is a fakakta design that should never have been commercialized and Ford seems completely unwilling to do anything about it. The next issue is going to be, mark my words, is that when they do replace the oil cooler they will likely damage or cause to become damaged some other collateral part(s) that need to be removed or replaced to do the repair. I can almost guarantee it as Murphy's Law never sleeps...

So abandoning the 3.0L Powerstroke is Ford's Afghanistan Withdrawl moment.....
 

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@RLVoumard - THIS is my strategy exactly:

I have a ESP, but this has me thinking do I have Ford do ALL OIL CHANGES and then the responsibility is on them. If owners had to pay for the repairs for a broken rubber stopper would be a $1,500 assembly and 10 hours shop time..
I bought both FordProtect PremiumCare and PremiumMaintenance ESPs for 8yr/100K (which ever comes first) with this as my primary motivation. My dealership knows they are the only ones wrenching on my truck = they are 100% responsible for something like this. My dealership were the ones who installed my Titan 40 gal XXL fuel tank and my Gatorback mudflaps! And my dealership will be the ones installing a PPE Deep transmission pan at 60K miles.

Should F150 PSD Owners have to do this?
Answer: Absolutely Not, but in this case I was concerned enough to pony up for both plans.

I concur that this design is stupid and that the rubber stopper should be made available as an individual orderable part.
 

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@RLVoumard - THIS is my strategy exactly:



I bought both FordProtect PremiumCare and PremiumMaintenance ESPs for 8yr/100K (which ever comes first) with this as my primary motivation. My dealership knows they are the only ones wrenching on my truck = they are 100% responsible for something like this. My dealership were the ones who installed my Titan 40 gal XXL fuel tank and my Gatorback mudflaps! And my dealership will be the ones installing a PPE Deep transmission pan at 60K miles.

Should F150 PSD Owners have to do this?
Answer: Absolutely Not, but in this case I was concerned enough to pony up for both plans.

I concur that this design is stupid and that the rubber stopper should be made available as an individual orderable part.
We should just bite the bullet, figure out who manufactures the oil filter housing, and order up a bunch of stoppers. Then we can just ship them out to anyone experiencing this for like $5. They probably have a bin full of them at the manufacturing facility. all cartridge filters have some kind of drain back valve, I think this design is pretty typical.
 

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We should just bite the bullet, figure out who manufactures the oil filter housing, and order up a bunch of stoppers. Then we can just ship them out to anyone experiencing this for like $5. They probably have a bin full of them at the manufacturing facility. all cartridge filters have some kind of drain back valve, I think this design is pretty typical.
I wish it were that simple as the problem is that the offending part(s) are not drop-in replacements which is why they need to replace the entire oil cooler assembly. Just a really dumb design.....
 

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Just wondering, if the anti-drain stopper gets dislodged from under that wrap-around metal piece that pressed onto the aluminum post (during oil filter installation), does that stopper just sit somewhere within the oil filter housing? If that stopper is not damaged and can be retrieved, could it be reinstalled if a way could be figured out how to install the stopper without removing the wrap-around metal piece?
Perhaps an "L" shaped piece of metal or plastic with the short end of the L with a dovetail shaped recess that fits the stopper, and which can hold the stopper while it's slid under the hole in the metal wrap-around stopper holder. Then the metal holder could be pushed down, forcing the nub of the stopper through the hole?
 

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Just wondering, if the anti-drain stopper gets dislodged from under that wrap-around metal piece that pressed onto the aluminum post (during oil filter installation), does that stopper just sit somewhere within the oil filter housing? If that stopper is not damaged and can be retrieved, could it be reinstalled if a way could be figured out how to install the stopper without removing the wrap-around metal piece?
Perhaps an "L" shaped piece of metal or plastic with the short end of the L with a dovetail shaped recess that fits the stopper, and which can hold the stopper while it's slid under the hole in the metal wrap-around stopper holder. Then the metal holder could be pushed down, forcing the nub of the stopper through the hole?
Not sure but from everything I've read on this forum and been told by the dealer that if the nub were to become dislodged it could end up anywhere in the oil cooler..
 

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Not sure but from everything I've read on this forum and been told by the dealer that if the nub were to become dislodged it could end up anywhere in the oil cooler..
I wouldn't worry about it going down the hole, it is too large unless it rips into smaller pieces. I guess it could get into the cooler itself, I found mine just lying on the bottom of the filter housing. Still, it is not doing it's job if it has dislodged and must be repaired. If I remember right the hole in the bottom is about half the size of the nub.

If we could just buy the rubber part, the repair would be a breeze. The steps involved are simple- remove the plastic engine cover, remove the oil filter, the filter housing will empty itself automatically as that is what the rubber is there for, and I found the oil had already drained completely. Then carefully clean the whole area, and using an "L" shaped tool carefully pry up the metal spring. It should come up real easy. Once the rubber is back in place (wish we could buy a new one) press the spring back onto it's "spike" that holds it into place and you are done. Disclaimer: This should not be done on an engine with a warranty unless you are as dumb as I am. You alone are responsible for any damages DIY work does to your expensive engine. Still, if you are comfortable, this is a fairly simple job- especially if your rubber part can be reused.

Here is a photo of the metal spring. The rubber "nub" goes into the top hole and the "X" on the bottom just fits over the little post in the filter housing to hold it in place.

Body jewelry Jewellery Circle Symbol Metal
 

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Stopped by Ford today to check on the truck (Dealer oil change => rubber check valve/stopper knocked off) Going on Day 10, and still waiting on a "couple of gaskets..."

The Service Manager has looked at the procedure and YES the filter MUST go in first.

We took a filter and used my old housing and did it Ford's way: the filter "clicks" in place and does not freely spin inside of the housing -- without a doubt this is the correct/best way to preserve the rubber part and the way Ford wants it done per service manual. The filter will/does also SNAP inside the cup, and to the untrained this would seem to be the logical way to re-assemble the oil filter, but it's not the correct way. Might get away with it once or twice, but sooner or later you'll shear off the "nub"

My biggest concern is that Ford gets my truck reassembled w/o any collateral damage. This is no small job!

In my case the dealer was told by me (thanks to the forum) to follow Ford procedure (I guess this fell on deaf ears) and the oil change tech (that's what they call them) failed to do his homework by reading the service manual on the 3.0 diesel. All of this falls on the dealer, and they are not hiding from the blame ..

I am not sure what if any compensation owners are due, this is going to be a least 3 weeks of down time. All of which was preventable...

Assumption is the mother of all F.....k ups...................................
 

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Stopped by Ford today to check on the truck (Dealer oil change => rubber check valve/stopper knocked off) Going on Day 10 , waiting on a "couple of gaskets..."

The Service Manager has looked at the procedure and YES the filter MUST go in first.

We took a filter and used my old housing and did it Ford's way: the filter "clicks" in place and does not freely spin inside of the housing -- without a doubt this is the correct/best way to preserve the rubber part and the way Ford wants it done per service manual. The filter will/does also SNAP inside the cup, and to the untrained this would seem to be the logical way to re-assemble the oil filter, but it's not the correct way. Might get away with it once or twice, but sooner or later you'll shear off the "nub"

My biggest concern is that Ford gets my truck reassembled w/o any collateral damage. This is no small job!

In my case the dealer was told by me (thanks to the forum) to follow Ford procedure (I guess this fell on deaf ears) and the oil change tech (that's what they call them) failed to do his homework by reading the service manual on the 3.0 diesel. All of this falls on the dealer, and they are not hiding from the blame ..

I am not sure what if any compensation owners are due, this is going to be a least 3 weeks of down time. All of which was preventable...

Assumption is the mother of all F.....k ups...................................
Well, welcome to the "nub club"... No knock on the Quicklane people, they're just trying to earn a paycheck but it's clear they are poorly or maybe not trained at all. Compounded by the fact that, in my case, they only serviced one (1) other 3.0L Powerstroke so they are just not familiar with the motor. My advice is to speak with the service manager and request a diesel tech to replace the filter properly. If they have any interest in quality and integrity they will comply with your request and not cause $1000's in damages. If not then all you can do is complain like ****, write negative reviews, etc. That might provoke a response. As for FORD doing anything, they have done absolutely nothing of any real material value, so call but be prepared to get nothing but a lot of lip service.
 

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Not sure I want to be in the "nub club" I farm for a living and am around a lot of equipment and understand that "mistakes happen" , but I do not excuse the dealer ( or any professional ) for not taking time to understand the job at hand... It would be really great if all Ford Engines had the same oil filter assembly... so if you a doing job for the first time , do the homework. It will save Ford some money , save the dealer the embarrassment , and keep owners happy.
 

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Not sure I want to be in the "nub club" I farm for a living and am around a lot of equipment and understand that "mistakes happen" , but I do not excuse the dealer ( or any professional ) for not taking time to understand the job at hand... It would be really great if all Ford Engines had the same oil filter assembly... so if you a doing job for the first time , do the homework. It will save Ford some money , save the dealer the embarrassment , and keep owners happy.
Totally agree.
 

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Update -10/13

The longest and most expensive oil change saga continues for my truck.. Going on 3 weeks , it seems everyday the dealer finds a "little something" that is needed, but was not ordered originally. The latest is a coolant hose . From what I am seeing and hearing, the dealer is replacing with NEW almost every part that was disassembled . Not sure what Fords policy is--- don't trust the old parts - components ???

This is costing FORD a fortune........ I asked the service manager , how many 3.0 liter diesel's do you maintain ? After all we are in the heart of the San Joanquin Valley , the largest AG producer in the US ... You must sell hundreds of F150's ??? We have maybe 5-6 3.0 liters we service. Great

I told the service manager---when this truck is done YOU DRIVE it for a day. I'm expecting it back the way I left it PERFECT !
 

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Update -10/13

The longest and most expensive oil change saga continues for my truck.. Going on 3 weeks , it seems everyday the dealer finds a "little something" that is needed, but was not ordered originally. The latest is a coolant hose . From what I am seeing and hearing, the dealer is replacing with NEW almost every part that was disassembled . Not sure what Fords policy is--- don't trust the old parts - components ???

This is costing FORD a fortune........ I asked the service manager , how many 3.0 liter diesel's do you maintain ? After all we are in the heart of the San Joanquin Valley , the largest AG producer in the US ... You must sell hundreds of F150's ??? We have maybe 5-6 3.0 liters we service. Great

I told the service manager---when this truck is done YOU DRIVE it for a day. I'm expecting it back the way I left it PERFECT !
Also, pay attention to the engine area when they are finished as it has been my experience and others have reported that in their haste to complete the repairs the mechanics neglect to put things back as they found it from the factory. I had numerous wires and clips that hold them on specific points not replaced properly. Not a huge deal but if they didn't see fit to do that what else did they not do???
 

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Also, pay attention to the engine area when they are finished as it has been my experience and others have reported that in their haste to complete the repairs the mechanics neglect to put things back as they found it from the factory. I had numerous wires and clips that hold them on specific points not replaced properly. Not a huge deal but if they didn't see fit to do that what else did they not do???
I second this.
 

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@RLVoumard - sounds like you have developed a good working relationship with your dealership's Service Manager.

When all-is-said-and-done, I would be very interested in the total cost for this warranty repair, including:
  • Cost of final parts list (all new parts installed)
  • Labor cost to remove/install new oil cooler assembly and all new parts
  • Implicit cost to dealer for loaner vehicle for ? days/weeks
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Bay being tied up
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Technician being tied up
Given how long this repair has taken and the parts involved, I wouldn't be surprised if the total cost for this F-Up is in the range $4K-$5K to the dealer.

Given the warranty fiasco with the SuperDuty 6.0L engine, you would hope Ford would have learned its lesson on managing warranty claims, and maybe (just maybe) issue a TSB to address the proper oil filter change procedure for our vehicles.

Nope, let's have our dealer network incur the costs above to deal with lack of employee training. Brilliant!

And Ford wonders why it is riddled with poor ownership experiences?
 

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Thinking of a TSB to address the proper oil filter change procedure, that would be a good step in the right direction. But, a permanent engineered solution would sure be better. Perhaps that metal spring the rubber nub goes through could be modified to put metal shoulders near the rubber nub hole? We can see from the picture posted previously the metal spring has an arch in it at the 3 and 9 o'clock positions. Perhaps small arches or small "waves" in that spring could be formed on both sides of the hole at the 12 o'clock position to keep the oil filter from contacting the nub of the rubber part. Then a recall could be done for Ford to replace the old style metal spring with a new style metal spring with the effect of eliminating this failure mode.
 
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