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@RLVoumard - sounds like you have developed a good working relationship with your dealership's Service Manager.

When all-is-said-and-done, I would be very interested in the total cost for this warranty repair, including:
  • Cost of final parts list (all new parts installed)
  • Labor cost to remove/install new oil cooler assembly and all new parts
  • Implicit cost to dealer for loaner vehicle for ? days/weeks
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Bay being tied up
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Technician being tied up
Given how long this repair has taken and the parts involved, I wouldn't be surprised if the total cost for this F-Up is in the range $4K-$5K to the dealer.

Given the warranty fiasco with the SuperDuty 6.0L engine, you would hope Ford would have learned its lesson on managing warranty claims, and maybe (just maybe) issue a TSB to address the proper oil filter change procedure for our vehicles.

Nope, let's have our dealer network incur the costs above to deal with the lack of employee training. Brilliant!

And Ford wonders why it is riddled with poor ownership experiences?
I've been told by the dealer that Ford only allows 4 hours of labor for this repair. As for the parts I tried to get some idea of the costs from the Ford Corp Customer Service person and ofcourse she was either clueless or was feining cluelessness. Either way, I say that they mechanic will likely be under some pressure to complete the repair at or below the allowed time which is why I suggest taking pictures of your engine compartment prior to the repair show them to your service manager and let them know that you expect to see it returned to the "as new" factory condition.

Honestly, since I haven't had the low oil pressure message since taking the oil canister off and torqueing it down to the 18 ft/lbs I'm seriously considering not doing this oil cooler replacement fearing that it will cause more hidden down the raod damage. I'm nearing 32K so I'm contempating buying a ESP but I need to get some specificity on what the 5yr/60K diesel engine warranty covers and doesn't cover. Also, now my Ford Pass app (specific to my VIN) says that the diesel engine warranty is 5yr/100k so that needs clarification.
 

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... I'm nearing 32K so I'm contemplating buying a ESP but I need to get some specificity on what the 5yr/60K diesel engine warranty covers and doesn't cover. Also, now my Ford Pass app (specific to my VIN) says that the diesel engine warranty is 5yr/100k so that needs clarification.
From Pages 11-12 of the 2018 F150 Warranty Guide

(4) Your vehicle’s direct injection diesel engine and certain engine components are covered during the PowerStroke Diesel Engine Coverage Period, which lasts for five years or 100,000 miles, whichever occurs first. The following parts are covered during this extended coverage period: the engine, cylinder block, heads and all internal parts, intake and exhaust manifolds, timing gear, harmonic balancer, valve covers, oil pan and pump, water pump, fuel system (excluding fuel lines, fuel tank and frame mounted fuel conditioning module sometimes referred to as the frame mounted pump/filter/water separator or frame mounted fuel filter/water separator), high pressure lines, gaskets and seals, glow plugs, turbocharger, two-stage turbocharger assembly, turbocharger actuator, powertrain control module, high pressure fuel injection pump assembly, injectors, injection pressure sensor, fuel rail pressure sensor, exhaust back pressure regulator and sensor, exhaust pressure sensor, manifold pressure sensor, intake air temperature sensor, crankshaft position sensor, camshaft position sensor, accelerator switch.
5yr/60K Warranty is Powertrain
5yr/100K Warranty is PowerStroke Engine
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Truck is back....

I picked up my F150 from my Ford dealer yesterday... 3 weeks from oil change to repair. All caused by the dealer not following factory procedure.

I keep in close combination with the service manager and diesel tech during the repair . There was no "coverup" from the dealer, We are sorry we made a mistake. They gave me a "loaner truck" and we will keep you in the loop, which they did.

The repair was first of this type that the dealer had done, and I was quite concerned that I would find some collateral damage from the repair. The time allotted - 9.1 hours is not even close and the needs parts had to revised 3x as the repair was ongoing.

The service manger was not aware of the this issue. He and I looked the the design once the oil cooler assembly was remove and he just shook his head, "This is a bad idea" in regards to design. I asked "what did this cost Ford to fix this blunder? He would give me a exact total, 2-3 thousand would be a close guess.

The service records reflect the entire issue ...including who did the damage ( dealer )... One interesting note.
* Oil low pressure light triggers @ 15 PSI / with out the stopper my truck registered 10 psi @ idle. This is the repair oder.

The service manger keep the truck an extra day , per my request and drove it. It was detailed when I picked it up with an apology .

So far its running as good as new............
 

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I haven't given up on doing something about this, and decided to try a different route by looping in someone who's fairly new YouTube channel posts almost daily Ford-specific content and growing fast: Rich aka @FordBossMe

I sent him the following e-mail this weekend & verified he received it during his live stream last night:
Got an interesting problem/dilemma us F150 Diesel owners are encountering that I thought I'd bring to your attention and maybe you can help bring this madness to Ford's attention. We are a small group of owners who took the big gamble on the F150 with the 3.0L V6 Lion PowerStroke Diesel that was used in the JLR LandRover Discoveries. I am 2018 owner (first model year) and Ford has recently announced that this engine option will be no longer available in 2022 models, so a grand total of 3.5 model years as the first ones came very late in 2018. Unsure of what the grand total of F150 PowerStroke Diesels (PSDs) were sold, but guessing by rough math, it's probably less than 150K total trucks.

Nonetheless, these trucks are out-in-the-field and all need frequent oil changes (10K recommended but I'm lucky if I get 5K miles before Oil Minder tells me it needs to be changed). The issue lies in the oil filter change procedure: This engine has a Oil filter cup/assembly that sits on the top of the engine. DIYer/Oil change techs need to unscrew the plastic cup with a large metric socket and when removed, the filter is locked into the cup. The proper procedure (documented in Ford Shop manual) says to remove the old filter from the cup, and then install the new filter on the shaft in the oil cooler assembly on the top of the engine, and then screw the filter cup back on and torque to specification.

What is unfortunately happening in-the-field is the DIYer/Oil change techs are pulling the old oil filter out of the cup and popping the new filter back into the cup, and then screwing the cup & filter back into the oil cooler assembly. When this happens the dry rubber on the bottom of the new filter assembly rubs against the nub/top of the rubber stopper (that acts as anti drain-back valve) attached to the brass ring on the bottom of the oil cooler assembly. With the head/nub of this rubber stopper sheared off, the rubber stopper comes loose and just floats around in the bottom of the oil cooler assembly, and it isn't blocking the drain back hole in the bottom of the oil cooler assembly, resulting in frequent Low Oil Pressure warnings in the IPC.

We have a very good forum thread that covers all the details on the F150 Diesel forums that I moderate:
Low Oil Pressure Message? | Diesel F150 Forum

We have probably 10 forums members who have encountered this issue and Ford has fired the parts cannon at this including oil pressure sending switches, oil cooler assemblies, and in one case a short block, along with several owners who have just sold their truck to get rid of the problem.

Now that we understand the problem, Ford's solution is to replace the entire oil cooler assembly, which is ~$300 part plus ~10 hours of shop time, as everything on the top of the engine (including all of the fuel injection lines) needs to removed be remove/replace the oil cooler assembly. All of this is the definition of stupidity cause by a pool oil cooler design and lack of training on proper oil filter change procedure, for probably a $0.25 piece of rubber.

Thinking this might make for a unique video/content for your channel, as no one I know of has addressed this. Personally I think Ford needs to issue a TSB on this at a minimum so that their own oil change techs change the oil filter correctly, and should probably redesign how the rubber stopper attaches to the brass ring so that the nub cannot be sheared off by improper oil filter change procedures = even Ford tech are making this mistake!

Please read thru the thread above for more details and how we arrived where we are. Luckily we had a another Ford tech who figured out the cause and posted the proper procedure from the Ford Service manual. Feel free to give me a call on my cell if you would like to discuss more or have any questions.

Anything you could do to bring this issue to Ford's attention would be appreciated = I figure you better than anyone will be able to get Ford's attention!

#SaveTheNub #SnubTheRub

Thanks in advance.
He acknowledged he saw my e-mail last night but admitted he wasn't exactly sure how to proceed. He indicated he was going to run the above by A-Rod (fellow Ford tech YouTuber who specializes in PowerStrokes) to see what they can come up with together.

No guarantees but figured shining a social media spotlight on this issue might be a better way to get Ford's attention!
 

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@hummincummins90 posted this in another (now locked) Low Oil Pressure thread:
I have the same problem Ford is telling me is the oil drained back tube in the filter housing and is a $4000 fix but it's not covered under warranty I have had this problem twice the 1st time I fixed it by changing the oil and not adding Lucas this time I don't know what to do
so I don't think I was too far off with my WAG estimate:
@RLVoumard
When all-is-said-and-done, I would be very interested in the total cost for this warranty repair, including:
  • Cost of final parts list (all new parts installed)
  • Labor cost to remove/install new oil cooler assembly and all new parts
  • Implicit cost to dealer for loaner vehicle for ? days/weeks
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Bay being tied up
  • Implicit cost to dealer associated with Diesel Service Technician being tied up
Given how long this repair has taken and the parts involved, I wouldn't be surprised if the total cost for this F-Up is in the range $4K-$5K to the dealer.
though some of the quoted estimate is dealer profit in @hummincummins90's case...

This is all still an exercise in stupidity...
 

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We should just bite the bullet, figure out who manufactures the oil filter housing, and order up a bunch of stoppers. Then we can just ship them out to anyone experiencing this for like $5. They probably have a bin full of them at the manufacturing facility. all cartridge filters have some kind of drain back valve, I think this design is pretty typical.
It is made by Mann, same manufacturer that makes the 3.0 diesel oil filters for Motorcraft.
 

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Did some internet searching this eve - prompted by the info the filter housing is manufactured by Mann.
Found these forum posts:
Same anti-drain back valve problem on Volvos: oil filter anti drain back
Volvo with same oil filter housing design as our 3.0's, and an idea for checking the function of the anti-drain back valve: https://www.matthewsvolvosite.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=92091&p=565684#p565684
Volvo owners looking for the same part we are - the little rubber stopper - and an attempt at making a functional equivalent: Does anyone know the part number for the rubber piece in...
 

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@STIAJW - great internet sleuthing!

The stopper in their pics looks a little flatter to me, but the brass ring definitely looks very similar.

What I find striking is that all of these posts are fairly recent (2020/2021) on Volvos that are 10+ years old (2008 LR2 3.2, 2010 S80 3.2, etc) and owners are just finding out about this similar issue just now. The failures here seem to be due to age (one posts mentions how brittle/hard the rubber is) so I don't think this nub shearing is as prominent as on our trucks, but it is clear from the pics that the oil filter housing designs are similar. One post also indicates neither the ring nor the stopper are available individually (same complaints we have)
 

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Mann is a huge OEM supplier to Euro vehicles/engines. Range Rover, Jag, Volvo, BMW, and Ford are just a few. One would think this 50 cent rubber tit would be available, but maybe not??!! Make more money selling assembly. I changed my oil today and oiled the heck out of the bottom of the new filter, as you know, the end cap is not as smooth as the oil cartridges of yesteryear (dating myself). I picked the smoother side for down position as it always seems one side doesn't have the rough pleats poking through as the other? Strange for sure.
 

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I wonder if it may be worth contacting Mann directly regarding what appears to be a too-common failure mode of these oil filter housings? MANN+HUMMEL | Leadership in filtration (mann-hummel.com)
I think Mann knows how to make a more robust oil filter drainback. Here are photos of a Mann filter for my Volkswagen Touareg. The plastic nub on the bottom of the filter has a o-ring that gets replaced every time the filter gets replaced. Pulling the filter out of the housing creates the drainback path. Note that the bottom of the filter has tabs to prevent rotation or stress on the nub when the filter cap is screwed on. Perhaps there is a patent on this design? Or maybe there isn't enough data/failures out there to warrant redesign

In theory a filter design like this one could retrofit into the existing housing, if the market was big enough.

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From an overall perspective, am I missing something, or is this drainback only in play when changing the oil? I'm just wondering if mine ever fails, is there any reason I couldn't just weld up the hole and extract oil out of the housing with a syringe during oil changes? If cleaning the aluminum and welding is a spatial impossibility, perhaps tapping it for a set screw would achieve the same thing.
 

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I'm just wondering if mine ever fails, is there any reason I couldn't just weld up the hole and extract oil out of the housing with a syringe during oil changes?
Seems that could work - but would need the ability to suck out the oil from the inside of the oil filter housing to prevent the old oil from running all over the engine when replacing the oil filter.
 

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I think Mann knows how to make a more robust oil filter drainback. Here are photos of a Mann filter for my Volkswagen Touareg. The plastic nub on the bottom of the filter has a o-ring that gets replaced every time the filter gets replaced. Pulling the filter out of the housing creates the drainback path. Note that the bottom of the filter has tabs to prevent rotation or stress on the nub when the filter cap is screwed on. Perhaps there is a patent on this design? Or maybe there isn't enough data/failures out there to warrant redesign

In theory a filter design like this one could retrofit into the existing housing, if the market was big enough.

View attachment 2458
View attachment 2459
From an overall perspective, am I missing something, or is this drainback only in play when changing the oil? I'm just wondering if mine ever fails, is there any reason I couldn't just weld up the hole and extract oil out of the housing with a syringe during oil changes? If cleaning the aluminum and welding is a spatial impossibility, perhaps tapping it for a set screw would achieve the same thing.
Apparently it is play while the engine is running as many say low oil pressure light comes on when the rubber tit breaks? Baby diesel has plenty of room for a taller filter/cap. I would like something more robust for sure.
 

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I've been searching for an aftermarket replacement for the rubber anti-drain back stopper.
Wondering if part no. G2013 on this page may be close enough? Heyco® Rubber Push-In Bumpers

This web page has an image of this part: https://www.hawkusa.com/manufacturers/heyco/hardware/g2013

The material needs to be oil resistant and heat resistant. This part is nitrile, which is oil resistant and heat resistant to ~250 degrees F.
The mounting hole diameter of 0.188" is slightly larger, I think, than the existing hole in the spring metal the filter media pushes down on. But, if that spring metal needs to be removed to install the rubber stopper, then drilling the hole a bit larger would not be too difficult. The overall diameter of the part G2013 looks to be slightly less than the original rubber anti-drain back stopper. I'm using the dimensions from this post: oil filter anti drain back
It looks like the part that gets pulled through the mounting hole is too tall - it would need to be trimmed shorter after installation.
 

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After reading this thread I didn’t get much sleep last night. I thought a lot about it. Looking at the images there’s no doubt the rubber stopper design could be improved. Definitely installing a barb to hold the rubber stopper in place would help a lot.

But even though the rubber stopper design seems to be inadequate and prone to falling out, maybe the filtered doesn’t rub against the nub and break it off unless you use the factory procedure.

When looking at the images of this spring, it seems to me this spring is shaped with a rising arch in its center. The key here is the arch which by design should be the only part of the spring that touches the filter. When the filter presses against this arch it pushes the spring and rubber stopper down closing off the drain hole. Because of the rising arch on the spring the filter should remain above the nub on the stopper. The trick is to not over compress the spring downward. I drew a picture of this for illustration purposes.

Now it makes sense to me as to why when screwing down the oil filter onto the cooler, it comes to an abrupt stop (I’m sure by design), when its down as far as it should go. This makes it hard to over tighten and over compress/flex the spring. Knowing what we know now makes it more important than ever to use a torque wrench for this. (18 inch lbs)

Those of us who change our own oil on this vehicle know when installing the oil filter into the canister before screwing it down onto the oil cooler (like it seems most of us do), it takes a fair amount of force to get that filter snapped up in place into the filter canister. If my theory is correct, that would be the safer way to install the filter as opposed to the procedure recommended by the factory. When you install the filter onto the oil cooler first, then put the canister on, when you screw the canister down, it’s going to put a lot of downward force on the spring before the filter snaps up into the filter canister. The spring will over flex downward and flatten. This is when the filter reaches down far enough to rub against the nub and break it off.

Please let me know what you think of this theory.

In reading I see some of you guys know what your actual oil pressure value is. Is that through using the FORScan program? If so how exactly is that done?
 

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Your drawing is spot on. When I change the oil, the filter is jammed pretty tight into the cap (Top part) to the point I have to take pliers or some other tool to remove the filter from its housing.

Back when I first started changing oil in this truck I inserted the filter into the cap, put a new o ring on, lubed the o ring and screwed the filter into place. After just a few changes my stopper was off and lying in the bottom of the housing. I now know that method doesn't work. Looking back I am sure the dry filter bottom was very hard on the stopper. Just applying a good coat of oil on the filter bottom would probably be adequate regardless of whether you put the filter in the cap or the housing but I now always follow Ford's procedure.

The only way to read oil pressure that I know of is via a gauge, not the dashboard "idiot gauge". I installed a separate mechanical gauge just for this purpose.
 

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When looking at the images of this spring, it seems to me this spring is shaped with a rising arch in its center.
I've, too, noticed that arch in the spring.
I have a bit of a different theory: if the oil filter media is placed in the plastic cup and then screwed onto the oil filter housing, it appears the nub on the rubber anti-drain back valve is the high point and that nub contacts the bottom of the oil filter media as it is rotated will screwing down the cup.
But, following Ford's recommended procedure of placing the filter on the post of the oil filter housing first, I've noticed there seems to be an interference fit between the inside of the filter and the bottom of the post. There's a short shoulder at the bottom of the post, and I think the oil filter media is held down by this shoulder such that the filter presses down on the two high areas of the spring, pushing the anti-drain back stopper (and it's nub) down and out of reach from the filter. Thus, if the filter turns while the plastic cup is being installed, the nub is not rubbed wrong.
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During removal, everything is oil soaked and lubricated resulting in less friction on the nub. Also, note in this picture, the nub appears to be tilted slightly in the unscrewing direction.

Just one person's thoughts . . .
 
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