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In case any of you were wondering what kind of temps your engine is running during a regen I took screenshots of ForscanLite on my iPhone right before and during a regen.
The first gauge is the catalytic converter temp, 2nd is the cylinder head temp, 5th is a "dummy" EGT (exhaust gas temperature) that I forgot to remove from the layout, 6th, 7th and 8th are actual EGT's at different sensor locations, 9th is the engine oil temp, 10th is the oil pressure and 11th is the oil temperature in the oil pan.
Don't pay attention to where the gauges say "x1000", that is just an error in the programming, those are the actual temps in Fahrenheit.
The 1000+ temps is why I warn to watch for shutting down your engine during a regen, that kind of temp will scorch the oil on the bearings in your turbo because your turbo continues to spin long after the oil quits flowing. If you think you're in a regen give your engine a few minutes to cool down before turning it off. If you turn off the engine not realizing you are in a regen you can usually smell a slight odor of something overheated, just restart your engine and let it idle for a few minutes.
 

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What program is this reading it?
 

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Personally, I always try to let both of my diesels idle at least a minute before shut down. In my Ram's owner's manual it gives you cool down times depending on how you are driving before stopping. Up to 5 minutes if towing in hot weather or up hill. I do the same with my turbocharged Arctic Cat diesel. See a lot of diesel truck guys: Duramax, Powerstroke and Cummins owners shut their trucks off and jump out without any idle down. Figure they must have deeper pockets than me. BTW, I'm a boatbuilder and have sold hundreds of diesel powered boats. The owners with problems are the guys that start em up and go screaming out of the harbor without warming up or never give em a chance to cool down. Perhaps the Powerstrokes continue to circulate oil after shut down though. Also, regens in my Ram occur about every 750 miles or 1 per 26 gallon tank and last 10-12 miles. When I see the message, hit Tow/Haul button and drive until its over.
 
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The Super Duty's flash a message up when going in to regen but the F150's don't ( I wish they did!).
Majority of people have never been taught about turbos. The gas ecoboosts run the same risk of burning up the turbo bearings. A driver comes flying up to a convenience store and shuts off the engine not realizing the turbo is probably still spinning at 50,000 rpms and now has no oil supply.
I'm not aware of any Ford diesel that continues to pump oil after the engine is turned off but I could be wrong. Of course the factories don't want us to know how to make the engines last forever, planned obsolescence and prematurely worn out engines are what makes a profit.
 

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I know that these turbo's are ball bearing as opposed to the standard journal bearing. So maybe with this type of bearing the cool down period isn't as important, as the interface isn't maintained by the oil flow/film. This might be why ford is OK with start/stop on this engine, as well as not showing the DPF % to the common folk. In the coffee table book however I do see that there is an oil supply line to the turbo.

Regardless I still turn off my start stop every time I hop in (second nature now like putting on my seat belt), and I don't shut it down during a regen if I can avoid it.

With that said, I think my truck continues it's regen while i'm stopped, as I can hear a fast ticking from the engine, and the DPF% will tick down while i'm at a stop light. I've never tried putting it in park to see if that stops, but will try next time.
 

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Would driving at residential speeds (engine not under much load) suffice for idling/cooling the turbo? If you aren't accelerating, driving fast or pulling, is the turbo essentially coasting?


Foolish questions?
 

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Would driving at residential speeds (engine not under much load) suffice for idling/cooling the turbo? If you aren't accelerating, driving fast or pulling, is the turbo essentially coasting?


Foolish questions?
I am pretty sure if you are driving a while without making boost, it is cooling down or not generating much heat. Not an expert but that's what I read.
 

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Consensus on the internet seems to be between 300-450F(or so) to shutdown. Everywhere I drive I am always right around that since it takes a bit to park, etc.

Basically, dont pull a full load, come to a stop and immediately turn engine off. I doubt many of us do that. Mine cools down really fast.

Technology and mechanics have come a long way, we really do not have much to worry about with these trucks. Just take it easy a bit before shutdown.

FYI The chart is from a 2014 RAM Diesel.
 

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Oil.
 

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Well I take that back. Maybe coolant runs thru these also. I need to look at mine tomorrow.
 

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Hey, great info here. I had not given a thought to having some idle time prior to shut down, but will going forward, so I appreciate everyone who has contributed to this thread. Ideally, one would have a bluetooth OBDII constantly plugged in and have it bluetooth connected to an old phone mounted for the purpose of keeping an eye on temps and also use that to guide that one has idled long enough to cool things down before the engine shut down.

I do have an approach to idle time after start up, and that is I don't move the truck until the map appears on the screen. That is my process for warmer outdoor temps. During the Polar Vortex up here I waited several minutes before I moved the truck after start up.
 

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Hey, great info here. I had not given a thought to having some idle time prior to shut down, but will going forward, so I appreciate everyone who has contributed to this thread. Ideally, one would have a bluetooth OBDII constantly plugged in and have it bluetooth connected to an old phone mounted for the purpose of keeping an eye on temps and also use that to guide that one has idled long enough to cool things down before the engine shut down.

I do have an approach to idle time after start up, and that is I don't move the truck until the map appears on the screen. That is my process for warmer outdoor temps. During the Polar Vortex up here I waited several minutes before I moved the truck after start up.
This is also a nice monitor for those who don't have a Iphone, Forscan, EzLynk, etc.

https://edgeproducts.com/shop/insight-cts2
 
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