Diesel F150 Forum banner
81 - 100 of 122 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Okay, even though WFH today, I met up with a couple buddies for lunch, so that gave me a chance to provide an update.

Round-trip total from home to lunch and back was 6.8 miles of city driving, with 50mph speed limit and some stoplights and stop signs. In that trip, my DPF % Full went up from 30% to 40%, and as you can see in the attached photo below my Average Speed was 19mph.

Just as I would have expected, I watched the Average Speed drop while stopped by a red light (and I intentionally disabled ASS for the sake of this testing). I did not do a highway run where I reset the Average Speed to see what it would do, but I'm sure then it would jump up to whatever you were driving at.

My conclusion is that this Average Speed addition to the IPC (Instrument Panel Cluster) will have a definite correlation to distance traveled between Active Regens, and I will start keeping a log book once my next Active Regen completes (by resetting the Average Speed as soon as the Active Regen completes).
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
@kdjasper - I need to double-check but I am pretty sure I am filling up with 100% petroleum diesel, as I don't remember seeing all of the biodiesel pump signage like you showed in a previous post. I just spent about 15 minutes looking for that old post, so if you can find those pics with the biodiesel marking on the pumps and post the Permalink, that would be great.

@jmperlik sorry I forgot to respond to your request above. What you are looking for I posted in the Mileage Report thread, and here is a link to that post -->
https://www.dieself150forum.com/forum/18960-post32.html
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
878 Posts
Have an interesting Regen scenario yesterday that should shed some additional light on this topic. @kdjasper and I have been recounting our Active regen stories and hopefully we haven't been scaring people off with all of our "actively managing" Active-Regens w/highway mileage talk, as this is not something Ford (or anyone else) expected either of us to do.

I have explained that my reasoning for actively managing Active-Regens was to see if I could increase my mileage between oil changes (Oil Life %) as reported thru the Ford Pass app
=> By increasing to more highway miles (and higher average mileage between Active-Regens), I was able to raise my expected range from 3200 miles to over 5200 miles on this change
=> I also explained that actively managing Active-Regens is incredibly inconvenient, as taking 45 minutes to an hour out of your day when your DPF hits 100% is a royal PITA
=> Traveling 10 miles (in the wrong direction) to get to the nearest interstate and 10 miles back after a full Regen is a waste of fuel and tacking on additional miles

Since I achieved my goal of pushing my Oil Life % back above 5000 miles on this oil change, I decided I could end my experiment and stop the extra highway "blow-out" runs when I hit 100% DPF Full. This condition occurred last night as I was leaving the car wash after work. Instead of heading to the highway for a "blow-out" run, I decided to continue home instead of heading the opposite direction to the nearest interstate. My DPF_REGN_STAT flipped to "Activated" on a stretch of 6-lane divided highway with a lot of traffic lights, so I thought for the worse that the stop-and-go traffic would abort any Active-Regen prematurely. I saw EGT12 and EGT13 spike above 1000F while EGT11 was over 700F and EGT14 lingered below 500F. To my surprise I made it thru this stretch of about eight (8) lights with EGT12 and EGT13 still above 1000F and DPF_REGN_STAT remaining in "Activated" state.

Once I got thru this section of the local highway, the road does open up for nearly a mile before the next light and after that there are maybe 5 or 6 lights in a 4 mile stretch (all past the bridge I need to cross to get home), so I decided to see how long I could hold DPF_REGN_STAT "Activated" on this local highway, knowing that I would encounter multiple traffic lights and probably not hit/time "green" on every one of them. As Murphy would have it, I don't think I hit/timed a single green light, but you know what: I never dropped out of Active-Regen and successfully completed a full Active-Regen down to 0% Full = At no time during the Active-Regen did EGT11 drop below 572F (it came close while stopped at a few red lights) while EGT12 and EGT13 always remained above 1000F, even with turning around about halfway thru the Active-Regen.

About a mile from my local brewery that I frequent, I noticed that DPF_REGN_STAT flipped to "Off" after the ICU reported 0% DPF Full. Satisfied with the results of this little DPF Regen experiment, I decided to reward myself with an Oat IPA at the brewery and watch the Blue-Sharks NHL hockey game. Based on this experiment, I have proven that you can make it thru a full Active-Regen without having to "head on to the highway" for a consistent, uninterrupted Interstate "blow-out" run.

Just wanted to share this experience with everyone, lest new or prospective owners think they need to be actively managing DPF Active-Regens w/only interstate highway mileage = you can make it thru a full DPF Active-Regen with local driving provided you are up to operating temps and drive for long enough (20+ minutes) with EGT (Exhaust Gas Temperatures) in range (Above 572F) to allow Active-Regens to continue.

I plan to use this local highway technique to manage my Active-Regens in the future, as my local highway drive is not really that far out of my way of my daily commute. I do realize that my average distance between Regens will probably drop below 150 miles due to my increased local driving, but I am hoping as long as I am avoiding Partial Regens (where I was seeing 50-70 miles between Regens) wherever possible that I will make 5000 mile oil change intervals.

I still believe Ford should be exposing DPF Full % to all F150 PS Diesel owners, as without FORScan to monitor these DPF-related PIDs or to program DPF Full % onto your IPC, you will have no idea when you are close to DPF Full. Thanks for reading...
 
  • Like
Reactions: kdjasper

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
This past weekend again I went well past the 300 mile forced Active Regen by disabling Auto Regen in Settings (added to the Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC) by adding Operator Commanded Regen (OCR) via FORScan), as you can see in the attached screenshot.

When I re-enabled Auto Regen, I was at DPF 60-65% Full, knew I was well past the 300 mile mark since last Active Regen, was about 30-35 miles from home on the highway, so decided it was a great time to complete an Active Regen before arriving back home so I enabled it to happen. Had I not enabled the Active Regen, I may have been able to get to 500 miles before reaching DPF 100% Full.

Interesting that this trip was ~277 total miles, and all of it towing my fiberglass boat. When I left the house I was at DPF 75% Full. The entire 277 miles I never went above 75% Full, and in fact dropped down as low as 60% about 3 times from Passive Regen activity, and that was during towing. We were staying out of town at a hotel to do some fishing over the long weekend, so the truck had several shut downs and start ups, so the 277 miles was not all highway mileage.

This was also from my first fill up of my new 48-gallon Titan replacement tank, to which I put in 4 ounces of Hot Shot's Secret Everyday Diesel Treatment (EDT). I had ran several tanks previously with Fuel Ox, and decided to give Hot Shot's the first try on the new tank. I need to see how Hot Shot's handles my 8 mile commute to work and back this week to see if it is increasing DPF % less than Fuel Ox and will report back on that.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Bump since this is not displaying properly in Recent Discussions because the most recent post above was made during the site slowdown issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Sorry guys, had been busy and get back to the forum and see I was referenced in this thread.
@kdjasper your research is all good. To quantify, several studies have confirmed a range of 40-50% reduction in particulate matter emissions with pure biodiesel versus pure petroleum diesel. So with the B20 we are running, the DPF should be seeing about 9% less soot than the non-biodiesel user.

I believe the key issue in this case is how the %full is calculated. If it is just a theoretical soot amount based on engine operating parameters, the engine doesn't "know" the biodiesel content so you don't get credit for it. If it is actually measuring the differential pressure across the DPF, then the regen interval should be lengthened with increasing biodiesel inclusion because it is actually accumulating less soot.

Has anyone had any luck finding the DPF dP in the engine params?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
@CYODESL thanks for jumping in with your input. Your knowledge of biofuels is valuable expertise in this forum.

Has anyone had any luck finding the DPF dP in the engine params?
@jmperlik has located this among other params earlier in this thread. I have attached a FORScan screenshot from my truck today, that has DPF_DP as one of the params in the screenshot. @jmperlik and I have both been posting this FORScan screenshot for comparison earlier in the thread if you want to view a few others.

So, I had a new experience with my truck on Tuesday this week. I was able to go from DPF 0% Full to DPF 60% Full in a single day! How did I do it? Unintentional, but I had a lot of 10 miles or less runs throughout the day and the DPF just kept filling up from all those short distance runs. Having this experience, I now can see how some of you are able to get to DPF 100% Full in under 100 miles--I am a believer now that it can be done, and I could probably even make that happen with my truck. In fact, I got to 100% Full today after adding about 140 highway miles on top of the 90 city miles. When I started on the highway I was ~85% Full, and it took ~140 highway miles to go from 85-100%. My Average MPH for this Active Regen at 231.8 miles was 34 MPH.

Normally all these city errand runs are done with the zoom-zoom Mazda CX-5, but on Tuesday I did them with the 3.0 and had a lesson learned from that!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Excellent! I can't wait to get FORScan and start tracking myself. What adapter are you using for FORScan? The "FORScan adapter recommendations" thread on here comes up as "Invalid Thread specified" no matter how I try to get to it and looking on the FORScan and other forums seems like an endless pit of issues and complicated mods required. I just want something I know works out of the box! Thanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
862 Posts
OBDLink MX+
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Last post is #89 of 88, so posting this bump to see if the thread count gets corrected...nope, didn't fix the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Testing again...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
862 Posts
Removing this. kdjasper. I sent you a PM to discuss issues...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Can't get to page 10 from page 9, seems this thread has some corruption issues.

Okay, this current post has correct the corruption issues within this thread now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
OBDLink MX+
Thanks @wreedsvt! Got my MX+ yesterday and did the mods quick last night. I was at 90%, so looking forward to choosing when to do my next regen soon.

I also noted that DPF_DP doesn't have any data, so it doesn't look like we're not getting a true dP measurement. However, DPF_INP does show the inlet pressure so that is a close approximation since the downstream pressure drop shouldn't change much.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
878 Posts
Just thought I'd chime in with my latest Regen experiences now that I am starting on a fresh oil change. Anyone who has been following my previous posts knows that I was trying to raise my last oil change interval from ~3200 miles to my planned 5000 mile interval for my Ford Extended Maintenance plan. I was able to stretch this last oil change to over 5000 miles by a bunch of unusual one-time trips and actively managing Auto-Regens via "blow-out runs" of pure uninterrupted Interstate mileage, which I found to be very inconvenient.

I found by chance that I could drive local highway with stopping for traffic lights while continuing to hold "Activated" DPF_REGN_STATus, thereby eliminating the need to drive 10 miles down to and 10 miles back from my closest Interstate. I have been actively managing my Auto-Regens using this technique for the past month and found that my Average Distance between Regens (DPF_REGN_AVGD) is around 125 miles for my typical driving conditions (which I have explained previously in this thread) which equates to a Regen roughly every 5-6 days for me. I think I read on one of the other forums ~150 mile Regen interval for the Dodge EcoDiesel. Before FORScan, I was under the false impression that Active Regens were on a much longer interval.

I have found a better stretch of local highway north of me (with only about 4 lights before an uninterrupted 10 mile stretch) where I have optimized my "blow-out" run to the point where I can time the turn-around and be less than a mile from my final destination when the Active-Regen finishes in less than 20 minutes. Of course, I can only do this because I have exposed DPF Full% via FORScan...

With everything I have learned up until now about regens, I plan to continue with this new local highway route to actively managed my Auto-Regens and use this fresh oil change (10K oil change service earlier this week) to see how this affects my Oil Life % as reported by the Oli Minder on the Ford Pass app. I am hoping that this new technique will allow me to reach my goal of 5000 mile oil change intervals. Thanks for reading...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
jmperlik,


Thank you for sharing all of your info. Not trying to go off the topic of this thread, but also don't want to start a new one.


I noticed GM is advertising their 3.0 Duramax as having a low (and high?) pressure EGR and started looking into it. A low pressure EGR takes exhaust after it has passed through the DPF and introduces it into intake air upstream of the turbo, with a valve somewhere between that determines how much combustible oxygen to displace according to power needs and other parameters. Having learned the downside of the traditional EGR (exhaust directly from the exhaust manifold to the pressurized intake manifold) introducing sooty exhaust which is further mixed with oily crankcase-vented air in the cylinders tends to foul oil I thought this seemed like an obvious solution. Why did it take so long? Well, Caterpiller began using post DPF gas for their EGRs (Cat called it CGI, "clean gas introduction" I believe), BMW uses it on their diesels, Land Rover's new straight 4 diesels use it, and very surprisingly, the Land Rover TD6 uses low pressure EGR. I believe it is the TD6 diesel on which Ford based the Lion 3.0...if so, why the heck didn't they include this technology? I've been looking on Land Rover forums for talk about active regens but haven't found much, nor talk about oil life. Granted, a different driver may gravitate towards each vehicle, but I wonder if it also true that the Land Rover 3.0 Diesel is easier on its oil and produces less soot for the DPF to remove, and if either is true, could it be because of the different EGR mechanism? All things being equal GM's straight 6 is a better idea than the V, but if we find that Chevy drivers go much longer between active regens and their oil remains cleaner longer I think there would be valid criticism of Ford's choices. An already tepid diesel market needs to be provided engines that mirror gassers in maintenance, durability, operations, etc. I would appreciate it if someone knowledgeable on the subject could talk me down. Also, I'm not intending to be negative towards Fords 3.0! Sounds like a great engine and I want to drive a Lariat with one. Unfortunately I also like to research and learn, which allows me to get in my own way when I should be going to a dealer...


Thanks in advance-
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
878 Posts
@snowshew - I have been continuing to post my Regen experiences primarily for you, as a.) you were very interested in DPF Regen frequency and b.) you are researching a purchase.

I will continue to post my experiences to get as much info out here to prospective owners, as Ford has intentionally buried this info, rather than expose it to the owner. The Average Distance between Regens (DPF_REGN_AVGD) is much lower than I expected and one might consider this to be the "dark & dirty" side of Diesel ownership? If I had all of this information up front before my purchase, I may have made a different engine option decision. Only time will tell if clogged DPFs due to partial regens will be a problem for us -- all I can say is that I am doing everything that I can to prevent that from happening.

Thanks for posting the info and your research on the GM 3.0 Duramax engine with the low pressure EGR system, which sounds interesting to say the least. I think it would help with cleaner oil but I not sure at this time whether it would help or hurt DPF regen frequency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
jmperlik,
You are very generous, thank you.
I am afraid I am inducing buyers remorse into you though. If it sounds like I am talking myself out of this engine, and by extension casting doubt on your decision, that is not my intention and it is not fair to you. I don't have a strong need for a purchase at the moment, but if I did, I would absolutely buy a 501a 3.0. Any quirks involved with diesel operation in 2019 are what they are, but the sum of them does not equal any of the several specific issues related to other motors on the market; "typewriter tick" etc. I think this will be the best Ford engine to own long term and the most enjoyable to drive. Maybe I'm just nostalgic for my 82 300TD, but I can't remember enjoying an engine as much since. Gassers just aren't the same.
Thanks again for allowing me to benefit from your experiences with the truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Please see attached FORScan screenshot for an update on my truck's Active Regens...

My overall average distance between Active Regens is now 316.9 miles, which is over the expected 300 max because I have been disabling Auto Regen in Settings when towing which lets me blow past the 300 mile forced Active Regen interval because when towing Passive Regen is happening which very much stretches out the distance before reaching 100% Full and needing to enable Auto Regen in Settings to activate the Active Regen capability again. You will see one of my Active Regens I stretched it out to 457.5 miles when I enabled Auto Regen in Settings, and even then I was only like 75% Full but knew that the return to city driving without towing would have me at 100% Full within a day or two and I was on the interstate with 25 miles to arrive home so enabled the Active Regen to happen and get down to 0% plus some cooling down miles before reaching home.

As you can see, I have been doing a fair amount more city driving lately as I have 3 regens in the 214-246 mile range--well, those regen intervals would be a mix of city and highway miles also.

I just completed an Active Regen today, and I actually had to do an intentional "blow out" run which is the first one of those I have had to do now in probably 6 weeks. I did have the Auto Regen disabled in Settings to prevent an Active Regen from getting underway in the city (thus shows 1.2 miles traveled with Exhaust Filter Full) and enabled once I was heading down the freeway onramp. I had to do this after work in rush hour traffic, so I even had to come to a complete stop on the freeway and had several miles of < 30 mph and to my surprise the Active Regen still made it down to 0% Full, so it may seem as long as you don't shift into Park the Active Regen may stay underway even in slow down or stop situations.

It does seem that everyones unique driving characteristics and situations influences their own distance between Active Regen interval experiences.

Hope this post is helpful to those trying to understand the Regen process. I know it seems just when I think I have it all figured out I learn something new from experience as I did today.

Cheers
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Well...I think my truck went through this issue...I went through 10 gallons of DEF between oil changes...One day, I actually saw a "engine" light come on...then it cleared quickly?

I have an Edge CTS2 tuner on my truck that I am beta testing...I can tell when it's regenerating and I checked the code and and it was a DEF code.

Anyways-I was regenerating about every 180-200 miles...yes, I pull a boat and a fifth wheel camper but not for great distances. The local lake is only 30 miles away so I take the 5th wheel camper down (ultra light 25ft heartland Elkridge-7200lbs) and then go back and get the boat(19ft Tracker-weight..unknown yet). I'm going to tow both once I get a hitch welded to my 5er. So lots of pulling but NOT excessive. My PCM tripped a code P208E.

Well, it seems that's a common code to trip on these trucks...the injector on my DEF was stuck closed?...or the sensor was wide assed open cuz I went through a crazy amount of DEF....Ford flashed the PCM and it runs better now and MPG's have gone up.
 
81 - 100 of 122 Posts
Top